Volume 17, Number 2, Summer 2014

Contents

REGULAR ARTICLES

Collaborative Voice: Examining the Role of Voice in
Interdisciplinary Collaboration .…..................................................... 139
B. J. Cosley, S. K. McCoy, and S. K. Gardner
Understanding Individual Experiences of Cyberbullying
Encountered through Work .….......................................................... 163
W. Heatherington and I. Coyne
SYMPOSIUM
A Symposium on Public Administration in Films ............................ 193
S. Mastracci
Symposium Introduction .................................................................. 194
S. Mastracci
Emotional Labor as Carnivalesque Behavior: Avoiding
Administrative Evil in the Public Space ........................................... 199
C. L. Pressley, and M. E. Noel
“Deserve’s Got [Everything] to Do with It”: Unforgiven, Revenge,
and the Revival of the Western .….................................................... 217
J. A. Joyce
Sacrificing Youth for a Fabricated Humanity: Governance,
Youth, and Onto-Theology in the Cabin in the Woods ..................... 236
A. E. Mayo

ABSTRACT. The present study examined the role of voice in facilitating interdisciplinary collaboration. According to the group-value model of procedural justice, voice relates to interpersonal relationships among co- workers because it facilitates a greater interest in helping the group (e.g. group-serving behavior). We argue that because of the relationship between voice and one type of group-serving behavior--advice sharing--that greater perceptions of voice would also predict more collaboration. In a field study examining collaborative social networks among university researchers, we found that greater perceptions of voice positively related to both degree of advice sharing and collaboration. Moreover, the extent to which individuals shared advice fully mediated the relationship between perceived voice and collaboration. Implications for voice and collaboration are discussed.

ABSTRACT. Metaphors are used a great deal in theory but are not always fully explained. This paper expands on the carnival metaphor used by Boje (2001) by clarifying the type of carnival the metaphor describes, in this case the sideshow carnival. The sideshow carnival metaphor helps to explain how emotional labor can be used to avoid situations of administrative evil that have been partially caused by the separation of mind/body of public servants operating in public space. The authors of this article illustrate the application of the sideshow carnival metaphor by showing how emergency professionals in the area of natural disaster management have become more professionalized over the last several decades. This professionalization has led to a focus on the rational mind over the emotional body. By engaging in emotional labor, emergency professionals are engaging in carnivalesque behavior that helps to repair the mind/body connection. If the connection is not repaired, the rational mind will take over and the public space wherein the emergency professional exists can co-opt the professional leading them to be unable to see the potential evil acts they might commit.

ABSTRACT. Little research has explored individual experiences of cyberbullying in working contexts. To start bridging the gap in our current understanding, we used Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) to explore individuals’ shared experiences of cyberbullying encountered through work. In-depth interviews, conducted with five cyberbullied workers from the pharmaceutical, charity and university sectors, resulted in five superordinate themes: attributions of causality; crossing of boundaries; influence of communication media richness on relationship development; influence of communication explicitness and openness; and strategies for coping. Overall, some similarities emerged between cyberbullying experiences and traditional bullying research, yet the complexities associated with managing relationships, both virtually and physically, were central to individuals’ subjective experiences. Practical implications in developing effective leadership and business policies to support virtual groups and manage behaviours are discussed.

ABSTRACT. This essay weds conceptions of justice within Public Administration to the theme of revenge in the Hollywood Western, arguing that the revival of the genre in the 1990s reflects changes in the public conception of due process and equality before the law. The Western genre’s evolution is illustrative of the way definitions of justice are socially, contextually specific. Unforgiven illustrates this shift because the violence in the film symbolizes the vengeance culture so anathema to American notions of procedural justice and explores shifting conceptions of justice through a 19th century allegory of injustice, the heart of which is the treatment of a person as property. This fantasy of the violent resolution of conflict is examined against Public Administration’s insistence upon resolving competing conceptions of the good through peaceful, deliberative modalities.

Examining public administration and public service through film is not new (Borins, 2011; Chandler & Adams, 1997; Goodsell & Murray, 1995; Holzer & Slater, 1995; Kass & Catron, 1990; Kroll, 1995; Lee, 1993; Lee & Paddock, 2001; Marshall, 2012; McCurdy, 1995; McSwite, 2002; Weilde & Schultz, 2007)—indeed, popular culture continually produces material with which we can understand our field anew. Government and public service prove fertile topics for television courtroom dramas, hero stories featuring police officers and firefighters, and films highlighting the role of the military or the President in everything from historical dramas to alien invasions. Films employ metaphors and symbols to tell their stories. Metaphorical concepts allow us to understand and experience one kind of concept or event in terms of another (Lakoff & Johnson, 1980). Metaphors substantially structure how we understand a concept. For instance, identifying the concept “argument” as a battle or war wholly reshapes our understanding of it compared to identifying it as a dance. In the former, “though there is no physical battle, there is verbal battle, and the structure of an argument— attack, defense, counterattack—reflects this” (Lackoff & Johnson, 1980, p. 4).

ABSTRACT. This paper analyzes Drew Goddard and Joss Whedon’s recent film, Cabin in the Woods (2012), using Thomas J. Catlaw’s Fabricating the People (2007), to illustrate the precarious position of youth at the beginning of the twenty-first century. The author argues that just as the film requires young people to sacrifice themselves for the good of humanity, recent political events ask young people to sacrifice their well-being for the sake of neo-liberalism. Throughout the film, youth refuse the sacrificial logic of the Director, choosing instead a “logic of subtraction.” While the film seemingly ends with the nihilistic end of the world, when viewed through the lens of Fabricating the People it may also offer a hopeful suggestion for how young people can resist and change oppressive systems of governance.

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