Volume 17, Number 4, Winter 2014

                                                                                 CONTENTS
 
                                                                      REGULAR ARTICLES
 
Exploring the Potential of Social Networking Sites for Public Service Professionals ............................... 401
Q. Hu and T. Bryer
 
                                                                             SYMPOSIUM
 
Symposium on the Changing Bureaucratic Compact: Part I .......................................................................... 428
H. Getha-Taylor and E. Gibson
 
Symposium Introduction ....................................................................................................................................... 429
H. Getha-Taylor and E. Gibson
 
Doing Less with Less: The Decline of American Governments ..................................................................... 437
R. W. Cox III and T. M. Ostertag
 
Codes of Ethics, Public Values, and What Public Servants Offer the Bureaucratic Compact .................. 459
B. J. Johnson
 
Employee Job Satisfaction and Organizational Performance: The Role of Conflict Management ......... 498
J. D. Coggburn, R. P. Battaglio, Jr., and M. D. Bradbury
ABSTRACT. Organizational conflict is often thought of as a malady to be avoided or quickly resolved. Such views neglect the potential value of conflict—that is, the constructive management of conflict—to organizational outcomes. Managerial practices resulting in too little conflict may shape and reflect an organization hypersensitive to discord, dissent, and innovation. But management practices promoting excessive conflict may overload an organization with information, rendering it incapable of reaching timely decisions, generating animosity, or creating other unproductive outcomes. This paper examines constructive conflict management, which gives employees voice and encourages authentic participation in decision-making. We hypothesize that such an approach is positively related to employee job satisfaction and organizational performance. However, given the potential for "too much of a good thing" when it encouraging conflict, we also test for a curvilinear relationships between conflict management and organizational outcomes. 
 
"To work in an organization is to be in conflict. To take advantage of joint work requires conflict management" (Tjosvold, 2008, p. 19).

INTRODUCTION TO THE SYMPOSIUM ON THE CHANGING BUREAUCRATIC COMPACT PART I

ABSTRACT. Public administration has become the victim of its own success. Public policy making and problem solving during the first three decades after WWII began from an assumption that public managers had the competence to overcome policy barriers. The "do more with less" slogan was a statement of professional competence. It was adopted because many believed it was an affirmation of that competence. Now it represents a fiscal demand as a scold to those who will otherwise waste the money. What the public hears is a perverse joke. The goal must be more effective governance, by approaching fiscal stability as a strategic enterprise. The potential tools for more effective services exist and are applied by governments across the globe. Yet the public clings to failed practices (NPM) that are best when dealing with short-term issues.
ABSTRACT. Social networking sites (SNSs) have established an important presence in our daily lives and at work. This study explores how public service professionals use SNSs and how they perceive the potential of SNSs. This study further examines the relationship between the use of SNSs and social trust and civic participation. Last, this study identifies the challenges and opportunities facing public administration practitioners who use SNSs to build collaboration and promote public interests. Based on the nationwide survey results, this study provides a broader understanding of SNS use among public service professionals. Furthermore, it also provides management recommendations on how public service professionals can make full use of SNSs to facilitate their interactions with other public service professionals and citizens, and foster collaboration to pursue public interests.
ABSTRACT. Over 100 years ago, the bureaucratic compact and five professions were established: city/county management, city planning, civil engineering, landscape architecture, and architecture. In exchange for merit employment and independence from politics, these professions offered expertise and related values. To understand those values and changes in the compact from the 1900s to today, codes of ethics from the five professions were examined. Anticipated changes were a movement from traditional public values to business values including New Public Management. However, findings show traditional values persisting over time (e.g. public interest), but not many New Public Management values (e.g. innovation). Modern values do appear and expand professionals' responsibilities into environmental protection, sustainability, and human rights, which influence what these professions offer as they seek to uphold their end of the bureaucratic compact.
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