Volume 18, Number 1, Spring 2015

Addressing Procedural Bias in Municipal Planning Governance: A Case for
Incorporating Citizen Participation within Technical Advisory Committees ……..    1
S. Kleinschmit
                                                            SYMPOSIUM
Symposium on the Changing Bureaucratic Compact: Part II ....................…….….   21
H. Getha-Taylor and E. Gibson

Fiscally Driven Compensation Reform and Threats to Human Capital

Capacity in the Public Sector ..............................................................................    22
J. J. Llorens
Training Top Civil Servants in Turbulent Environments: An Ongoing
Struggle for Curriculum .......................................................................................    47
A. A. Halley
Holding Employees Accountable for the Accomplishment of Organizational
Goals: The Case of the U.S. Federal Government ..............................................     75
E. V. Rubin
Retaining Public Value and Public Law Value in Outsourcing ......................…..    105
C. L. Rush and N. C. Zingale

Abstract. We argue that the proliferation of governance in the public sector has raised questions regarding individual constitutional rights. While some proclaim cost savings and entrepreneurial solutions to vexing social ills, others suspect that these benefits don’t outweigh the risk of diminished accountability and the loss of constitutional protection over public service production. We propose a new model to examine the relationships between direct government, governance, public value, and public law value. We apply this model to analyze two landmark Supreme Court cases and one contemporary federal appellate court case to explore the ongoing tension between the governance model and public service production. Our findings suggest that enforcible contract language and public-private entwinement can be used as tools to protect constitutional rights in the face of increasing pressure of governance approaches.

ABSTRACT. Compensation systems serve a critical role in strategic human resources management, and over the past twenty-five years, there have been an increasing number of public sector reform efforts aimed at better aligning compensation practices with institutional workforce needs. While many past reforms have been performance driven, the nation’s most recent economic downturn has served as potent catalyst for a renewed focus on public sector compensation, particularly reforms to public sector retirement benefits. However, given the traditional importance of public sector retirement benefits within broader bureaucratic structures, these new reforms hold the potential to substantially alter human capital capacity in the public sector. Using wage and retirement benefit data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey and National Compensation Survey, this paper finds that state and local governments face significant threats to their long-term human capital capacity in light of potential benefit reforms that place a disproportionate emphasis upon competitive wage rates.

ABSTRACT. Aligned appraisal systems explicitly hold employees accountable for contributing to the
accomplishment of organizational goals. Furthermore, appraisal alignment is consistent with both core
bureaucratic expectations and New Public Management control regimes, but the efficacy of the policy and its substantive impact have yet to be considered in detail. Over the last decade, federal agencies were encouraged to revise appraisal systems and include alignment. Using the bureaucratic policy adoption literature, an empirical model assesses why agencies choose to adopt and/or implement alignment. The empirical analyses reveal that not all agencies adopting alignment in their appraisal systems fully implemented it for employees and managers. Organizational resources and ideology of political appointees influence adoption, while the strength of strategic
program management efforts exhibits a weak association with implementation.

ABSTRACT. This article provides a historical literature review and exploratory descriptive case study of one U.S. Federal agency’s efforts to design an appropriate government-wide leadership development curriculum for incumbent top or senior civil servants. The U.S. Federal Executive Institute was founded in 1968, it spans the 20th and 21st centuries, it illustrates changes in the compact that exists between government and its top civil servants over time, and it illustrates challenges this agency confronts addressing the task of interagency leadership development. The main findings are three continuities and three discontinuities between curriculum development then and now. Conclusions outline issues for future interdisciplinary research to inform the intellectual roots for 21st century curricula aligned to emerging roles and the challenges top career executives actually confront.

ABSTRACT. This essay presents models of multiparty negotiation as a means to compare the conventional public meetings format of planning to a preliminary process, the technical advisory committee. A metric of market concentration, the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index, is used to quantify the structural advantages in each, and presented within the context of municipal planning processes. In doing so, this work advances several propositions: First, open meetings expand power differentials between parties, which lead to outcomes that reflect the political efficacy of participants over the regulatory purpose of government. Second, such meetings create substantial transaction costs for the public, creating a barrier to the expression of community values. Finally, preliminary processes constitute a more effective forum for citizen participation than open meetings.

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