Volume 3, Numbers 3 & 4, 2000

Contents

1. Rethinking Concepts, Concerns, and Collaboration in Inter-organizational Relationships ................................................275
     L. S. Dudley and J. Sutton
2. Important but Largely Unanswered Questions About Accountability in Contracted Public Human Services ...................283
     J. S. Ott and L. A. Dicke
3. Improving the Quality of Public Administration Research on Nonprofits: Dismantling the Three-Sector Model ..............319
     K. Cheever, N. T. Kinny and P. Wolfe
4. Persistence of Organizational Identity within Inter-Organizational Relationships ..................................................................345
     P. B. Welleford and L. S. Dudley
5. Treating Development Networks Seriously: What Public Managers Should Know ...............................................................359
     S. A. Maclin and L. F. Keller
6. Public Virtual Organizations ..............................................................................................................................................................391
     T. D. Lynch, C. E. Lynch and R. D. White, Jr.
7. Motivation and Evaluation in Environmental Management Networks .......................................................................................413
     L. S. Nelson
8. Doubt and Deliberation: Making Strategy in Ontario's Food Bank System ..............................................................................435
     A. Roberts
9. Spirituality and Dialogue Revisited ..................................................................................................................................................473
     T. D. Lynch and R. D. White, Jr.
10. Searching for a Collective Ethos in Interorganizational Relationships ..................................................................................479
     L. Dudley
11. The U.S. Public Dialogue on Trade Policy: An Initial Assessment ..........................................................................................503
     L. R. Geri
12. Beyond African Humanism: Economic Reform in Post-Independent Zambia ......................................................................521
     A. Sekwat
13. The Ethics of Leadership Trust .......................................................................................................................................................549
     A. C. Rusaw
14. Trends in 20th Century United States Government Ethics ........................................................................................................571
     S. Cohen and W. B. Eimicke
15. Spirituality in Public Service .............................................................................................................................................................599
     W. Bruce

ABSTRACT. Global izat ion accelerates the need to accommodate the ethical guidelines of different cultures, the subject of many of the papers in the symposium, in a similar manner, the increased use of interorganizational relationships to accomplish projects accelerates the need to confront the value discontinuities in collaboration among representatives from the public, private, nonprofit, and volunteer sectors within American society. Rather than tackling the question of the precise principles to follow in models of interorganizational relationships versus the need for the thick descriptions of the particular, the focus of this paper is more middle­ range. The paper outlines some suggested means of connecting the assumptions of several models of interorganizational relationships with the insights of models of establishing a collective ethos. The tone is meant to be tentative and suggestive of a way to begin connecting diverse strands of literature, the problematic posed by the increasing engagement of interorganizational relationships in public administration and the problematic posed in reaching ethical decisions. Neither a one best way model nor a contingency model is proposed, but instead a more modest hope that the field of public administration will increasingly pay more attention to interorganizational dilemmas.

ABSTRACT. The dual forces of an increasing dependency ratio and lower labor market participation on the part of mature individuals does not bode well for the American and European Communities. To begin to better understand such macro influences, changing demographic trends in the U.S. and European community with regard to the aging population and workforce participation are reviewed. In addition, recent research which continues to dispel the myth of a negative relationship between age and job performance is reviewed. A more informative way of looking at possible relationships between age and job performance is presented. A variety of contingent work arrangements and flexible employment policies are reviewed as a potential solution to the decreased supply of skilled labor for employers and the need for continued income and community involvement on the part of mature individuals. In addition, a call for a redefinition of how we currently view retirement is sounded.We conclude with recommendations for both employers and mature individuals on dealing with the issues presented.

ABSTRACT. This essay introduces the second and final ethics symposium on spirituality and dialogue. The first symposium, edited by Thomas D. Lynch, Ph.D., focused on individual spirituality. In trus, the second symposium, our attention expands to organizations and institutions and now turns to dialogue. Our theme however remains unchanged, for both spirituality and dialogue revolve around a more basic core of ethics that is global in scope. Readers of the dozen papers of the two symposia should look upon them collectively as their overall ethical theme, however loosely coupled, provides a powerful commentary on the emerging role that both spirituality and dialogue will play in a new ethically focused millennium. With little disagreement, the dozen scholars contributing to the two symposia argue that future challenges will require a much higher and more global ethical level in public administration than exists today. In a society where spirituality and dialogue will flourish, a higher ethical level i s not only a goal but a reachable one. To some, a higher ethical level is inevitable while to others it is reachable only through the difficult process of individual, institutional and global moral improvement.

ABSTRACT. Deliberation may be used by organizations or networks of organizations to manage the moral and technical uncertainties that are associated with threshold strategies -- that is, strategies whose superiority over a lternatives i s unclear . Much academic literature underestimates the importance of deliberation, largely because of its reliance on paradigms that view organizational life as though it were mechanistic or game-like. A new heuristic, based on the metaphor of organizations as assemblies, is proposed. The experience of Ontario's food bank community is used to illustrate how deliberation is used to manage threshold strategies. The paper discusses some difficulties in promoting deliberation.

ABSTRACT. Interorganizational collaboration is increasingly seen as an important process in environmental management. The new paradigm of managing places as ecosystems requires increasing attention to sustaining specific combinations of natural features, communities and institutions. Such projects are long-term, and therefore require the participation and support of often divergent interests. Sustaining collaboration beyond the initial agreement to work together requires attention to the motivation of organizations and their representatives, and to the importance of achievements for participants and external stakeholders. This pa per reviews the literature on motivation and measuring achievement in environmental networks.

ABSTRACT. There has been little public dialogue in the United States on the implications of the evident trend toward greater worldwide economic, social and political integration. This trend, generally t ermed globalization, has occur red largely as the result of political decisions by states to reduce their ability to restrict trade and investment. This article explores the barriers which may be blocking such a dialogue and several options for lowering certain of these barriers. Unless such a dialogue begins in the near future, the ability of citizens to influence these trends may be lost, with uncertain effects on governmental legitimacy.

ABSTRACT. This article argues that the virtual organization model (also called web-enterprises by the former U.S. Secretary of Labor. Robert Reich in The Work of Nations) can meet the challenge for our new age. This model is already in place in the U.S. federal government in the form of Cooperative Administrative Support Units (CASU's). These organizations bear a close resemblance to Reich's model and have documented significant successes. The article also argues that the implications and applications of the CASU in public administration are far reaching. This creative and innovative approach to responsible government warrants expanded use into new and diverse areas. Organizational designers should not restrict its use simply to rote administrative activities. This article draws heavily from the work of former Secretary Reich and Warren Master, Director of the National CASU Program in the U.S. General Services Administration. Both provide new paths of possibilities for administrators. Their leadership forges new and often brighter expectations for future organizational performance.

Go to top