Volume 18, Number 2, Summer 2015

The Longitudinal Influence of Narcissism in the Team Context ….........................       147
R. Felty, B. G. Whitaker, S. M. Bergman, and J. Z. Bergman
 
Organizational Justice: Antecedents and Consequences of Ghanaian
Industrial Workers ...................................................................................................      177
S. A. Gyekye and M. Haybatollahi
 
Management Matters in Renewable Portfolio Standards .......................................      206
N. Fowler
 
Organizational Justice: A Cross-National Comparative Study of Ghanaian
Industrial Workers and Their Finnish Counterparts ...........................................…..       231
Haybatollahi and S. A. Gyekye

The study tested a model of the antecedents and consequences of organizational justice among Ghanaian industrial workers (N = 320). Justice perceptions were examined in terms of their socio-cultural properties and demographic variables. These variables were examined in terms of their impact as antecedents and consequences of justice evaluations. Antecedents comprised work-related and personal characteristics. Consequences comprised perceived organizational support, organizational citizenship behavior, organizational safety climate, safety behavior, and accident frequency. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to test the hypotheses. Mplus-7 indicated a partial mediation effect in a multi-mediation model. Work-related variables strongly and positively correlated with organizational justice, and were generally better predictors of organizational justice than were personal characteristics. The results have implications to organizational behavior.

The increased globalization in organizations has created the challenge to investigate and understand the organizational behaviours of employees from different cultural backgrounds. The current study investigated organizational justice from a cross-national perspective. The Ghanaian participants responded to the English version, and the Finnish participants, a Finnish version. The analyses investigated differences on the three justice components (distributive, procedural and interactional). Further analyses examined which of the three best predicts job satisfaction, the relationships between demographic variables and justice perceptions. T-test, correlations, and regression analyses were used to test the hypotheses. Contrary to our expectations, Ghanaian respondents evaluated higher distributive and procedural justice. As predicted, they indicated more sensitivity to interactional justice than their Finnish counterparts. Significant links between all three justice components and job satisfaction were recorded in both samples. Interactional justice indicated the strongest influence. Demographic variables showed more impact on justice perceptions among Ghanaian workers than their Finnish counterparts. The study's theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

While many states have adopted renewable portfolio standards (RPS), they have employed agencies with very different missions to manage these programs. These organizational differences are important in understanding how agencies are approaching the policy implementation. However, there is little research on the comparative effectiveness of these implementation approaches. This article begins with a background of RPS programs, and presents a typology of RPS implementation agencies. The effectiveness of RPS implementation approaches is tested with a pooled state-level dataset covering 14 years of program adoption and implementation. The results indicate implementation approach is substantively important in explaining policy outcomes and the growth of renewable energy. More specifically, the findings suggest using an economic development approach is the most effective way of producing growth in renewable energy generation.

The current study integrates self-enhancement and social exchange theories to construct hypotheses in which team-level narcissism is expected to negatively influence team-level task performance ratings and team-level organizational citizenship behaviors directed at team members (OCB-Is). Additionally, individual-level narcissism is expected to negatively influence peer performance ratings. Based on longitudinal data collected from 89 study participants constituting 29 project teams, results indicate (a) team-level narcissism influences task performance, (b) team-level narcissism influences changes in OCB-Is over time, and (c) individual-level narcissism influences
peer performance ratings. Our findings suggest the necessity for practitioners to consider individual differences in the strategic formation of work groups.

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