Volume 6, Number 3, Fall 2003

CONTENTS
REGULAR ARTICLES
Customer Relationship Management: A Viable Strategy
for the Retail Industry? .............................................................. 329
J. Kenyon and M. Vakola
Transnational Corporation-Bangladesh Relations: A
Resource Dependence Perspective ............................................. 354
M. R. Islam
The Father of Europe: An Analysis of the Supranational
Servant Leadership of Jean Monnet ......................................... 374
B. Birkenmeier, P. P. Carson and K. D. Carson
SYMPOSIUM
Mini-Symposium 0n Public Service Ethics ............................... 401
C. W. Lewis
Mini-Symposium on Public Service Ethics: Introduction ....... 402
C. W. Lewis
Accountability and Ethics: Reconsidering the
Relationships ................................................................................ 405
M. J. Dubnick
Dynamic Interpretations of Civic Duty: Implications for
Governance .................................................................................. 442
V. Vogelsang-Coombs and L. Bakken
Adventures in Ethics and Politics: Tales Told by
Professional Public Administrators ........................................... 461
C. W. Lewis, A. M. Hess, J. Jakubowski, R. Occhiogrosso,
and P. Potamianos

ABSTRACT. This article examines the application of "resource dependency theory" to transnational corporations (TNCs) operating in host country countries like Bangladesh to explain the relationship between the TNCs and Bangladesh. Data indicate that while the TNCs' participation in a third world host country like Bangladesh is encouraged mainly primarily for promoting its economic development, TNCs are mainly attracted by the market size, purchasing capacities (determined mainly by GNP) of the population, and stable political condition of the country. Although examination of the application of resource dependency theory provides some insights into understanding the complicated relationship between TNCs and Bangladesh,, it has been also envisioned that several other factors, not explained by resource dependency theory, help explain the behavior of TNCs in a host country like Bangladesh.

ABSTRACT. This essay explores the norms of civic duty, based on the legal, ethical, and practical interpretations of democratic citizenship. The authors find that interpretations of civic duty are dynamic and touch on a fundamental political question: What is the proper balance between elected officials and the professional civil service in a liberal democracy? They conclude that the norms of civic duty are political interpretations concerning an institutional struggle over governance as much as they are matters of law, ethics, and best practice. Successive interpretations of civic provide an opportunity for the renewal of citizenship while channeling political conflict into liberal democracy's established institutions.

ABSTRACT. The cornerstones of servant leadership theory (service, trust, credibility, and vision) were used to analyze how one of the most outstanding leaders of the twentieth century, Jean Monnet, used his skills to solve difficult problems of regional and global dimensions. Many believe that this Frenchman possessed unusually astute leadership skills in guiding individuals and governments during critical times. His contributions during World Wars I and II were notable, but he is best remembered for his conception and instigation of the European Union. Known as the "Father of Europe," he became one of the most influential figures of the postwar era. Focusing on economic cooperation among European nations, he effectively used a quiet, behind the scenes approach, to advance his objectives.

ABSTRACT. While a relationship between accountability and ethics has long been assumed and debated in Public Administration, the nature of that relationship has not been examined or clearly articulated. This article makes such an effort by positing four major forms of accountability (answerability, blameworthiness, liability and attributability) and focusing on the ethical strategies developed in response to each of these forms.

ABSTRACT. Four professional public administrators returned to their alma mater to serve as role models, offer guidelines and cautions about working in highly political environments, and pose hypothetical case studies drawn from their own and others' experiences in such a setting. Counseling that the gravity and complexity of ethical dilemmas increase as one's career advances, they suggest that the tensions between politics and policy figure among the more serious sources of ethical challenges facing professionals in the public sphere. While proposing that the professional's duty in part is to empower elected officials to make the right decision with the best information and most useful tools, they note that some frustration is unavoidable in this complex environment; there are no easy answers because the issues themselves are not easy and perspectives about what is right and important vary. Centering on the duty of serving the public interest, their cases focus upon mixed allegiances, clashing loyalties, multiple perspectives, truthfulness and candor, privileged treatment, the appearance of impropriety, and accountability.

ABSTRACT. This paper uses as its focus the traditional U.K. retail industry at a time when competition from newer channels is increasing. Research into other industry sectors has proven that well planned and executed customer relationship management strategies can increase profitability by improving customer loyalty. Many areas of the retail sector appeared to have neglected the benefits of CRM strategies, and where attempts have been made to implement CRM one or more of the vital constituents - employees, customers and shareholders have been neglected. The true barriers to CRM implementation are often thought to be financial or technological, according to research into other industry sectors. In reality however, financial and technological barriers are less problematic than organisational change, cultural and people barriers. The results of the retail survey carried out by the researchers support their original idea that few sectors of the traditional UK retail industry have implemented CRM strategies, and those that have are still are the early stages in the cycle. The survey questioned retailers on 3 main areas - The Company; IT Strategy and Future Strategy. Results for each for area are presented and change implications are discussed.

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