Volume 20, Number 4, Winter 2017

                                                                      REGULAR ARTICLES

Sustainable Leadership: An Empirical Investigation of its Effect on Organizational Effectiveness .....      419
H.-W. Lee
 
Does Training Matter in Public Organizations? Assessing Training Effects in the U.S. Law
Enforcement Agencies ..................................................................................................................................      454
Y. Hur
 
Assessing the Capacity for Public Value Creation withinLeadership Theories: Raising the Argument      479
A. V. Roman and T. McWeeney
 
Goal Interdependence, Subgroup Formation, and Conflict in Teams..........................................................    519
(R) Y. Tan 

 

 

This research investigates subgroup formation as an important mediator in the goal interdependence-intragroup conflict linkage. Specifically, it proposes that subgroup formation will mediate the relationship between cooperative goal interdependence and intragroup conflict, but not for competitive goal interdependence and intragroup conflict. Further, competitive goal interdependence is posited to have direct, positive effects on intragroup conflict. Using structural equation modeling analyses with 79 student project teams, the findings revealed that subgroup formation fully mediated the relationship between cooperative goal interdependence and task and process conflict, but only partially mediated the relationship between cooperative goal interdependence and relationship conflict. As predicted, subgroup formation did not mediate the relationship between competitive goal interdependence and intragroup conflict; however, competitive goal interdependence was negatively, rather than positively, related to intragroup conflict.

This study examined the consequences of training on organizations. With data collected from 464 U.S. law enforcement agencies, training effects were explored in terms of crime control performance and sworn officers’ resignation in regression analysis. According to the findings, training did not significantly improve crime control performance and police officers tended to stay in current organizations when they received a longer training. This study also found that law enforcement agencies in large cities tended to require longer training hours for their police officers.

In recent years, public administration has been targeted by multiple reform efforts. In multiple instances, such initiatives have been ideologically couched in public-choice perspectives and entrenched beliefs that government is the problem. One unavoidable consequence of this continued bout of criticism is the fact that government currently has a noticeably decreased capacity of boosting creation of public value. Within this context, there certainly is an important need for approaches that would counterbalance the loss of public value induced by market fundamentalism. This article suggests that leadership, as a concept of theory and practice, due to its partial immunity to the private-public dichotomy, can provide a pragmatic avenue for nurturing public interest and public value within the devolution of governance, a declining trust in government and a diminished governmental capacity to propagate the creation of public value. While this article critically examines and assesses the capacity of different leadership perspectives in terms of creating and maximizing public value, its primary scope is not the provision of definite answers but rather the instigation of a much necessary discussion.

The concept of sustainable leadership is increasingly gaining popularity among organizational scholars. However, empirical evidences for the effectiveness of sustainable leadership are still lacking. This study investigated whether and how diverse elements of sustainable leadership influence the effectiveness of organization. Analyzing the large data collected from the employees of diverse U.S. federal agencies, this study found that sustainable leadership practices explained a significant variance of diverse aspects of organizational effectiveness. However, the different elements of sustainable leadership influenced the different aspects of organizational effectiveness to a different degree. The results showed that the relative strengths of the effects of each element of sustainable leadership differed across different aspects of organizational effectiveness. For example, promoting work/life balance was the most significant predictors of employee satisfaction, while its effect diminished when investigated against other aspects of organizational effectiveness.

Go to top