Volume 20, Number 1, Spring 2017

Volume 20, Number 1, Spring 2017
CONTENTS

REGULAR ARTICLES

Resistance Is Overcome in One Dialogic OD Model (Appreciative Inquiry) ………….....................................       1

A. H. Schmidt Jr.

SYMPOSIUM

Symposium on Social Media: Developments in Digital Democracy, Part II ……………...................................     50

S. M. Zavattaro 

The Potential for Paracrisis in Corporate Philanthropy and Social Media ...................................................    51

J. M. Persuit

Social Media Responsiveness in the Public Sector: A Study of Social Media Adoption in Three 

Functional Areas of Local Government …………………………………………………...................................................   72

D. J. Seigler

Social Media in State Lotteries: Exploring the Role of Technology in Program Marketing .........................   100

S. M. Zavattaro and D. L. Fay

Corporate philanthropy in the U.S. has emerged since the mid-19th century. This essay takes a historical and interpretive perspective on its practice. The author categorizes corporate philanthropy into four ethical models to examine each model’s communicative priorities and ethical concerns. These communicative priorities and ethical concerns become more complex as corporate philanthropic entities utilize social media. To this end, the potential for what Coombs and Holladay (2012) called a “paracrisis” emerges. This essay examines the potential for community partners to be affected by a corporation’s presence on social media (and vice versa) through the interpretive lens of the paracrisis. The paper concludes with recommendations for future research.

Based on the importance of citizen participation and the collaborative potential of online social media tools, this study tests four proposed influences on administrators who are deciding whether or not to adopt these tools to engage citizens.  A survey of 157 department managers from large U.S. cities shows that 82% report using some form of social media to engage citizens and that perceived organizational influences and administrator preconceptions have the strongest impact on the respondents’ decision to adopt social media. Possible explanations for the results are that the use of online social media in the public sector may be following a similar path of adoption as earlier forms of e-government or managers may be operating in a rational environment when deciding whether or not to adopt online social media tools.

State-sponsored lotteries are adopted to raise funds for state programs. As such, there is a public mission within these organizations; however, most operate like private companies, thus shifting the organizational ethos to profit maximization. Much research on social media focuses on federal and local government agencies. In this paper, we explore the role of social media in lottery program marketing. Through an analysis of random lotteries on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram, we find: 1) a focus on aspirational marketing to promote the lottery as a business entity through its products and 2) increased dialogue with followers (i.e. customers) compared to other public agencies. This is a shift in how public organizations traditionally use the social tools, showing there can be a balance between marketing and dialogue. 

This study was launched because practitioners of Appreciative Inquiry (AI) instilled awareness for needed AI outcome research.  Therefore, the goal of this research was to identify the salient AI processes and levers and the rate of AI success and failure.  This study was specific to U.S. municipalities due to a researcher finding AI failure probability therein.  In direct opposition, eight U.S. municipalities were identified from the literature as having utilized AI in 14 projects and all were successful even when resistance was present in three applications.  A survey revealed 15 AI initiatives identified as successful even when resistance was present in eight, resulting in validation.  This study utilized a mixed methods exploratory case study design, sequentially in the mix, consisting of a literature review and application of two unique instruments applied to three populations.

No content (see Symposium Part 1, Issue 4, Volume 19 (2016)

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