Volume 7, Number 3, Fall 2004

CONTENTS
REGULAR ARTICLES
Work Commitment, Job Satisfaction, and Job Performance:
An Empirical Investigation ........................................................... 289
A. Carmeli and A. Freund
SYMPOSIUM
Symposium on Organization Theory and Management in the
Twenty-First Century: Continuing the Philosophical Approach 310
P. L. Cruise and C. E. Lynch
Symposium Introduction .............................................................. 311
P. L. Cruise and C. E. Lynch
Enduring Narratives from Progressivism ...................................... 315
L. S. Dudley
Mary Parker Follett Lost and Found – Again, and Again,
and Again ................................................................................... 341
M. A. Feldheim
Positively No Proverbs Need Apply: Revisiting the Legacy
of Herbert A. Simon ..................................................................... 363
P. L. Cruise
Marshall Dimock's Deflective Organizational Theory ............. 385
J. A. Stever
Phenomenology and Public Administration .............................. 405
W. L. Waugh, Jr. and W. W. Waugh
The Existentialist Public Administrator .................................... 432
W. L. Waugh, Jr.

ABSTRACT. The philosophical roots of existentialism can be found in the writings of Kierkegaard, Heidegger, Sartre, and Camus. Sartre used existentialism to frame the social and political issues of the day after World War II and Camus helped popularize the philosophy's focus on individualism and personal freedom. Existentialism provided justification for challenging public officials and regimes and was embraced again by public administrators and citizens frustrated by the failures of foreign and domestic policies in the 1960s and 1970s. Today existentialism and transcendentalist phenomenology remain strong alternatives to empiricism as a methodology in the study of human behavior. They provide a philosophical basis for determining and applying ethical standards, as well as a basis for encouraging public administrators to address major societal problems rather than being overly focused on management technique and administrative process.

ABSTRACT. Coming from a long tradition of Quaker beliefs, Mary Parker Follett advocated for an integrative unity in the organization or state where members work together, consensus is built, and power is shared. She applied her process of integration to management practices in both business and government. Parker Follett's communitarian ideas and philosophy of smaller more participative government have often run counter to administration and managements' focus on regulation and centralized power. This has contributed to the benign neglect of Parker Follett's work in the administrative and management literature. Parker Follett's work has been lost and found repeatedly over the past half century. In the rapidly changing and uncertain times of the new millennium we need once again to rediscover her holistic and healing approach to administration and management.

ABSTRACT. Phenomenologists are among the strongest opponents of logical positivism. Mostly associated with Edmund Husserl, phenomenology is essentially an analytical method or framework for describing and explaining social relationships and psychological orientations. Phenomenologists attempt to account for the subjective qualities which logical positivists and empiricists assume to be unreal or are mistakenly treated as objective observable phenomena. The authors note that phenomenology has been absorbed into the literature and the language of the field especially in terms of how people do and do not relate to bureaucratic organizations and government programs.

ABSTRACT. The narratives that would give meaning to at least four generations of scholars and practitioners are amplified in the discourse growing out of the elements of technical rationality, pragmatism, evolution, and the rush of different ideas and new institutions that punctuate the Progressive period. The narratives explored below persist in public administration from the beginning of the twentieth century: preparation for the rise of national institutions, the citizen-state relationship, reconciling democracy and administration, and science and scientific management. Throughout the paper, the author's interest in the reconciliation of freedom and order is explored in the relationship between self and community, citizen and nation, and politics and administration.

ABSTRACT. In a significant, but iconoclastic, approach to Public Administration Marshall Dimock introduced many sprawling concepts, approaches, and arguments to modern organization theory. Dimock, a contemporary of Herbert A. Simon, challenged traditional wisdom with his gradual deflection away from conventional organization and administrative theories. Contrary to Simon's opinions, Dimock linked Public Administration back to classical thought, and rejected the modernists' definition of progress and the growth/decay explanations for organization development.

ABSTRACT. This study examines the relationships between joint work commitments, job satisfaction, and job performance of lawyers employed by private law firms in Israel. Based on Morrow's (1993) concept of five universal forms of commitment, their interrelationship was tested with respect to the commitment model of Randall and Cote (1991), which appeared to show in previous studies (Cohen, 1999, 2000) a better fit compared to other models. In addition, the study examined the relationship between the commitment model and work attitude and outcome, namely, job satisfaction and job performance. The results show that the commitment model of Randall and Cote was almost fully supported, except for the relationship between job involvement and continuance commitment. This relationship is better understood via career commitment. An interesting finding of this study is that job satisfaction has a mediating role in the relationship between joint work commitment and job performance. The article concludes with suggestions regarding further investigation of the interrelationships between work commitment constructs, and the relationship between joint commitment forms, job satisfaction, and job performance.

ABSTRACT. Beginning in the late 1940s, classical Public Administration was challenged by the works of Herbert Simon and the movement he started, logical positivism. Although only writing in the field for a few years, Simon shifted the locus and focus of the field so dramatically, for a time it almost disappeared from view. This article examines Simon's legacy, first by exploring its philosophical antecedents and its later epistemological progeny. The article concludes with an assessment of how the field of Public Administration responded to Simon's challenge in the late twentieth century and now, early in the twenty first century.

Go to top