Volume 8, Number 2, Summer 2005

CONTENTS
REGULAR ARTICLES
The Fifth Paradigm of Public Administration? Public Organizational Theory As a Possible Solution to the
Perennial Big Questions of Public Administration ..................... 133
P. E. French, R. A. Spears and R. E. Stanley
The Impact of Rational Organizations on Public
Administrators: A Structural Equation Model .......................... 155
M. G. Alkadry and R. C. Nyhan

SYMPOSIUM
Agency Bargaining Behavior in Multi-Party Environmental Negotiations: A Symposium ........................................................ 174
B. L. Lamb and N. P. Lovrich
Assessing and Improving Conflict Resolution in Multiparty Environmental Negotiations ........................................................ 175
R. O'Leary, T. Nabatchi and L. Bingham
Multi-Party Environmental Negotiations: Perspectives from Democratizing Nations in Latin America .................................. 210
D. L. Lybecker and J. E. Horan
Inter-Agency Collaborative Approaches to Endangered
Species Act Compliance and Salmon Recovery in the
Pacific Northwest .......................................................................... 237
N. P. Lovrich, M. J. Gaffney, E. P. Weber, R. M. Bireley,
D. R. Matthews and B. Bjork

ABSTRACT. We assessed attempts by federal and state agencies to utilize a Community Oriented Policing and Problem Solving (COPPS) approach to address endangered species and natural resource protection issues in two watersheds in Washington State involving listed species of salmon, steelhead and bull trout. In the wake of the listing of these species, NOAA Fisheries and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) joined to implement a multi-party collaboration to enforcement termed Resource-Oriented Enforcement (ROE). We sought to determine if federal and state resource agencies can collaborate effectively and if collaborative approaches can achieve short- and long-term resource protection goals. A citizen mail survey (n=800+ in each location) and extensive personal interviews with key actors were conducted to assemble evidence on the degree of success achieved in implementing ROE. Observed results suggest that collaboration can

ABSTRACT. This paper addresses the current "big questions" debate in public administration and proposes an appropriate placement for organization theory in the discourse of the discipline. Major scholars in organization theory are analyzed in terms of their relationship to the big questions. Public administration is discussed as a confused discipline, but a discipline nonetheless, and organization theory finds its place as the foundation for discussion and examination of public administration's "big questions."

ABSTRACT. This research examines environmental negotiations in two countries, Mexico and Ecuador, currently undergoing democratic transition. We examine the ability of democratizing political systems to respond to the pressures intrinsic to emerging pluralism. Using a comparative case study approach we examine environmental policy making for conservation. Mexico and Ecuador are at different stages in the democratization process with Mexico being more advanced than Ecuador. We conclude that Mexico's approach to communicative forums and its management of environmental decision making in a pluralist context is more systematized and less prone to corruption given the stronger set of democratic institutions. In comparison we find that Ecuador's political institutions remain weak and subject to informal pressures from emerging environmental groups as well as from established interests from the pre-democracy era.

ABSTRACT. The rational organization has long been an important tool in public administration (Weber, 1968; Simon, 1964; Alkadry, 2003). It is often identified with positive characteristics such as objectivity, expertise, efficiency, fairness and formalization. However, these same positive characteristics can contribute to a "darker side" of rational organizations. Hummel (1994) articulates this as a "bureaucratic experience" resulting from the interaction between administrators and bureaucracy, while others articulate it as the "organization man" experience. In this article, a conceptual model of the relationship between organizational rationalization and administrator experiences is developed. This model is tested using a survey of front-line administrators and a structural equation model of the relationships between these two concepts. The article concludes with a discussion of alternatives to technical rationality.

ABSTRACT: After reviewing the logic and basics of Environmental Conflict Resolution (ECR), this article analyzes the praise for and criticisms of ECR. This article acknowledges the initial successes in the 1970s and 1980s that led to a major period of expansion for ECR, and continues today, but argues that it must do a better job of proving itself. That is, proponents must conduct more rigorous assessments of its utility under different conditions and invest in data collection that goes far beyond present efforts. The article concludes by reviewing the challenges and opportunities facing ECR in the twenty-first century. Singled out for attention is the need for scholars and practitioners to understand ECR interventions as targeted at aggregate rather than dyadic relationships, as complex systems embedded in even larger complex systems, as time-extended phenomena, and as ripe for evaluation for their impact on substantive environmental outcomes.

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