Volume 8, Number 3, Fall 2005

CONTENTS
REGULAR ARTICLES
Responding to a Natural Disaster: How Japanese
Government's Responses to the Great Hanshin-Awaji
Earthquake Were Mirrored in the Eye of the Media ................. 287
N. Ainoya and R. C. Myrtle
Science versus Humankind: The Yin and Yang of Motivation
Theory ............................................................................................. 313
K. S. Rhee and T. H. Sigler
Municipal Service Bundling: The Case of San Antonio's
Neighborhood Sweep Program .................................................... 343
J. D. Coggburn and A. Vega
SYMPOSIUM
Symposium on Agency Bargaining Behavior in Multi-Party Environmental Negotiations: Part II ......................................... 371
B. L. Lamb and N. P. Lovrich
The Effects of Urgency to Reach Agreement on the Process
and Outcome of Multi-Party Natural Resource Negotiations 372
B. L. Lamb, J. G. Taylor, N. Burkardt and S. C. Gillette
Examining Barriers to Negotiated Environmental
Agreements ................................................................................... 396
C. A. Ramus and A. A. Marcus

ABSTRACT. We bring together disparate negotiation theory research in order to identify a composite set of potential barriers to reaching agreement in environmental negotiations. This framework builds on behavioral decision theory, showing barriers that arise from personal values and institutional values and norms, as well as from situational elements that influence individual behaviors and organizational strategies. We contribute to the literature on organizational behavior by making explicit the relationship between the strength of the situation and organizational behavior related to negotiations. The elements of situational strength have not been addressed adequately in prior negotiation literature. We incorporate this concept into a comprehensive set of barriers to offer explanations for the intractability of many environmental disputes.

ABSTRACT. Motivation theory in the 20th century has evolved to meet the changing social, political, and economic environment. The purpose of this paper is to examine the developmental path of modern motivation theory from the perspective of the Tao and the cyclical nature of Yin and Yang. We review motivation theory from the Industrial Revolution to the present. The developmental path during the past 100 years consists of seven distinct stages, each stage representing a significant shift in theory as well as a shift in the social, political, and economic environment in the United States. The dominant theme that emerges from the analysis is the discourse between science and humanity, and the revolving cycle of these fundamental theories throughout the century.

ABSTRACT. We studied seven hydropower license consultations to examine the role of a sense of urgency to reach agreement. Hydropower licensing consultations were studied because the statutory requirement for consultation encourages negotiation, all such consultations are similar, and a negotiated settlement is not a foregone result. Cases selected for analysis met screening criteria. Structured interviews were conducted with participants after the negotiations had been concluded. Respondent recollections were checked against the documentary record. A sense of urgency to reach agreement was a significant factor in the completion of these negotiations; where there was no shared sense of urgency, purposeful delay adversely affected the negotiations. Although a sense of urgency was experienced by at least one party in each case, only a shared sense of urgency at the end of the process proved significant. Delay did not prevent ultimate agreement but a shared sense of urgency brought speedier agreement and greater satisfaction with the negotiation.

ABSTRACT. When a natural disaster occurs, the media directs the public's attention to the key elements of disaster management and provides accounts of how effective the government is in responding to it. This study analyzed 80 reports contained in 21 stories published in three international newspapers and 35 editorial statements from 21 editorials obtained from two national papers regarding the Japanese government's responses to the great Hanshin-Awaji earthquake. Issue clusters for different levels of government responding to the crisis were identified. The lack of systematic reactions to the crisis provoked the most media scrutiny. The legitimacy of the government's behaviors in this area were perceived more negatively by the media than were the inappropriate behavior of elected officials or the lack of care expressed towards the victims by local officials.

ABSTRACT. Local governments play important roles in creating public value for their residents. Recognizing this, they have made improving local quality of life a high priority. Such emphasis has led to the development of various service innovations designed to make urban areas better places to live and work. This article examines one such innovation, the city of San Antonio's Neighborhood Sweep program (or, simply, "Sweeps"). Sweeps is an example of a general service delivery strategy we term "municipal services bundling" (or MSB). MSB entails targeting resources to particular neighborhoods and tailoring bundles of public services designed to meet neighborhoods' respective needs. Analysis of survey data collected from residents of "swept" neighborhoods from 1999 to 2002 suggests that MSB can have positive effects on overall levels of neighborhood satisfaction and, in the case of Sweeps, may empower local residents while promoting their sense of individual responsibility for neighborhood appearance.

Go to top