Volume 9, Number 1, Spring 2006

CONTENTS
REGULAR ARTICLES
Homosexual Managers and the Homosexual Impregnation
Policy .................................................................................................. 1
G. M. Caldwell
Mixing State, Market and Network Governance Modes: The
Role of Government in "Crowded" Policy Domains ..................... 27
R. Keast, M. Mandell and K. Brown
SYMPOSIUM
Symposium on Myth and Allegory in Public Administration ...... 51
A. J. Sementelli
Symposium Introduction ................................................................. 52
A. J. Sementelli
"Come Out Neville!": Some Thoughts on the Myth of
Progress ............................................................................................. 55
R. M. Cawley
Performance Budgeting: Descriptive, Allegorical, Mythical,
and Idealistic ..................................................................................... 72
R. J. Herzog
Government Is Them: How Traveling the Road to Wellville
Can Undermine the Legitimacy of Public Administration ........... 92
A. J. Sementelli

ABSTRACT. The Road to Wellville is a useful allegory to describe the consequences a therapeutic approach to Public Administration can have on citizen participation. A therapeutic approach assumes that the citizens in an administrative state, are sick, and therefore need intervention by the government to heal them, regardless of whether we want it or not. In The Road to Wellville, Kellogg, though well intentioned, relied on alternative, unconventional therapies to try to cure health problems. This paper uses The Road to Wellville to illustrate how public organizations that adopt a therapeutic approach can broadly undermine legitimacy.

ABSTRACT. The three governance modes of state, market and network have long been recognized as key forms of social organization. However, the failure of these modes to solve complex public problems has meant that new hybrid arrangements drawing on and mixing the strengths of each mode have come to the fore. This situation results in what is contended to be a "crowded" policy domain which may erode the potential for positive service delivery and programme outcomes. This paper argues that policy and decision-makers need to recognize the difference between these modes and select optimal mixes. The paper proceeds by tracing the evolution of the expanded mix. It sets out a coherent framework to aid decision-making and explores the challenges faced by governments in balancing the structural and operational mechanisms necessary to sustain the engagement of such a diverse set of players.

ABSTRACT. This essay emerges from the author's ongoing attempts to explore the implications of the postmodern condition on the activity called public administration. The approach is unorthodox; mixing current international events with history of science, administrative theory, and ending with an intriguing science fiction novel. The central theme of the essay is the myth of progress connected with Michael Spicer's excellent analysis of competing theories of state. Whatever else might be said of the essay, the argument comes full circle. It begins with the idea that governing is hard work and ends on the same note.

ABSTRACT. The homosexual community has undoubtedly been assuming senior managerial positions of authority within government for generations, Clinard (1968). However, homosexuals are now moving more publicly, rather than surreptitiously into the echelons of managerial roles within the bureaucracy, (Clinard, 1968, Barker & Allen,, 1976, Wofford, 1993). This research suggests that this homosexual openness has in some cases created an environmental despotism where the homosexual managerial minority may openly and selectively discriminate towards their fraternal association and specifically against the heterosexual majority. Is there now the means, for homosexual managers to impose retribution for the chronicled persecution of homosexuals by heterosexuals? If so, could this retribution be leading to homosexual managers replicating the ideologies of the "old boys' club" by creating their separatist "guys' club". Would this sex-oriented preference discrimination resemble a somewhat disturbing paradox: Discrimination defined by sex inclination and such discrimination which ironically was associated with the powerful heterosexual males, and which they mysteriously fought vigorously and actively against?

ABSTRACT. The descriptions of performance budgeting, based on theory and practice, allow for the application of Dante's allegory in The Divine Comedy. This allegory places performance budgeting into the spiritual domains of heaven, hell, and purgatory. These domains are used to frame the theoretical foundations of performance budgeting and to discuss a match with operational reality. Performance budgeting practices often fall between heaven, the optimal use of public revenues, and hell, the worst use of public revenues. It can be argued that most performance budgeting efforts tend to congregate in purgatory. Realizing purgatory allows for the recognition of principles that form the basis for performance budgeting to be classified as institutional myth. As institutional myth, the practice of performance budgeting is blocked from theoretical idealism.

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