Volume 9, Number 2, Summer 2006

CONTENTS
REGULAR ARTICLES
Public-Sector Managerial Values: United States, Canada,
and Japan......................................................................................... 147
P. E. Connor, B. W. Becker, L. F. Moore, and Y. Okubo
SYMPOSIUM
Symposium on Reinventing Public Governance in
Developing Countries: Part I .......................................................... 174
M. S. Haque and G. M. Mudacumura
Introduction: Reinventing Public Governance in
Developing Countries ..................................................................... 175
M. S. Haque and G. M. Mudacumura
Redefining the Role of the Public Service under Neoliberal
States in Developing Nations ......................................................... 191
M. S. Haque
Reinventing Hong Kong's Public Service: Same NPM
Reform, Different Contexts and Politics ........................................ 212
A. B. L. Cheung
The Prospects and Limitations of Civil Service Reform in
Korea: Strong Initiation, But Uncertain Sustainability?................. 235
M. J. Moon & P. S. Kim
Reinvention in Public Governance in Southeast Asia: Its
Impacts on Economic Sovereignty and Self-Reliance .................. 254
M. S. Haque

ABSTRACT. During recent decades, there has been a significant transition or "reinvention" in the mode of state governance in both developed and developing nations. In line with this global trend, most Southeast Asian countries have restructured the traditional state-centric mode of governance or the so-called "developmental state" in favor of market-led neoliberal reforms and policies, often under external pressure or persuasion. This new mode of state governance favoring global market forces has serious implications for economic sovereignty and self-reliant development in the region. In this regard, this article attempts to examine major domains and directions of reinvention in governance in Southeast Asian countries. It also explores the critical impacts of this recent market-driven reinvention on the economic sovereignty and self-reliance of these countries.

ABSTRACT. This article explains that in the current global context dominated by market ideology, there has been a significant shift in the nature of the state based on promarket neoliberal principles in most countries, including those in the developing world. Under this emerging neoliberal state characterized by the primacy of market forces and adoption of market-driven policies and programs, the role of the public service has also changed in terms of its increasing concern for streamlining public sector activities, enhancing economic efficiency, improving customer satisfaction, and so on. After exploring such impacts of the current neoliberal state formation on the public service's role, the article briefly examines the socio-political consequences of this changing role, especially in developing nations.

ABSTRACT. This article examines the rhetoric of recent civil service reform measures in Korea, their initial implementation, and growing concerns about their sustainability. Civil service reform in Korea was initiated by an enthusiasm for New Public Management (NPM) and public calls for reform. The changes initiated by the Korean Civil Service Commission and other government organizations have sought to encourage openness, competition, flexibility, diversity, and performance-based management. Despite the bold rhetoric heralding the reform initiatives, outcomes have fallen short of expectations, and many civil servants are losing their confidence and esprit de corps. Considering both the initial promise and the ultimate reality of Korean civil service reform, this article investigates problems and limitations confronting the sustainability of these reform measures.

ABSTRACT. It is argued in this introductory article that the contemporary trend of "reinventing governance", which began in the 1990s, has continued to expand globally to encompass many developing nations. However, there is no uniform and universal paradigm of government reinvention. In fact, there are certain cross-national and inter-regional differences, especially between developed and developing nations, in terms of the basic tenets, rationales, and implications of such reinvention. After presenting brief summaries of articles covered in this issue of the journal, it is suggested that due to unique contextual settings and people's needs in developing nations, this reinvention model itself has to be reinvented or revised in order to make it relevant or useful to these countries.

ABSTRACT. Hong Kong's public sector reform since the 1990s is not just a continuation of an administrative reform trajectory started in colonial years to modernize the civil service. Although concerns for efficiency, productivity and value for money have always formed part of the reform agenda at different times, an efficiency discourse of reform is insufficient for capturing the full dynamics of institutional change whether in the pre-1997 or post-1997 period. During Hong Kong's political transition towards becoming an SAR of China in 1997, public sector reform helped to shore up the legitimacy of the bureaucracy. After 1997, new political crises and the changing relations between the Chief Executive and senior civil servants have induced the advent of a new "public service bargain" which gives different meaning to the same NPM-like measures.

ABSTRACT. This paper reports an investigation of the personal-values systems of 567 public-sector managers from the U.S., Canada, and Japan. The results of this research indicate that, despite some specific differences, there is an overarching, coherent North American public-sector managerial values systems. Moreover, it is similar in some ways to that of its Japanese counterparts. However, these values systems – North American and Japanese – are clearly distinct.

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