Volume 10, Number 2, Summer 2007

CONTENTS
REGULAR ARTICLES
A Framework in Strategy and Competition Using Alliances:
Application to the Automotive Industry .......................................... 151
M. S. Chalhoub
SYMPOSIUM
Symposium on Labor Unions Today: Organizing and Politics,
Part I .......................................................................................... 184
P. L. Francia and R. C. Kearney
Symposium Introduction ................................................................ 185
P. L. Francia and R. C. Kearney
Wither Labor? Reassessing Organized Labor's Political Power 188
P. L. Francia
Organization Theory and Stages of Decline: The Case of the
AFL-CIO, 1955-2005 .................................................................. 213
T. E. Dark III
CTW VS. The AFL-CIO: The Potential Impact of the Split on
Labor's Political Action ................................................................. 245
T. Roof
BOOK REVIEW
Postmodern Public Administration (Revised Edition) ..................... 276
T. J. Catlaw

ABSTRACT. Unions representing 40 percent of union membership broke away from the AFL-CIO in 2005 to form a rival federation, Change to Win (CTW). CTW leaders argued that the AFL-CIO placed too much emphasis on politics and too little on organizing new workers. This study looks at the potential impact of the split on labor's political action in lobbying and electoral mobilization. It examines differences between Change to Win and AFL-CIO affiliates in their political action committee spending, their support of Democrats, and their overall political spending on lobbying and electoral mobilization and concludes that CTW unions are no less reliant on political action than AFL-CIO unions and are likely to continue their involvement in politics.

ABSTRACT. Despite the appeal of studying successful organizations, valuable tools have also been developed by social scientists for understanding organizations that fail. This study applies one such tool – a model of stages of decline – to the case of the AFL-CIO (American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations), an organization that has arguably been in decline for decades. The AFL-CIO is an interesting case due to the lack of agreement among key constituencies about the appropriate criteria for measuring organizational performance. Reformers and conservatives have struggled over this issue, each viewing the conflict over performance criteria as crucial in determining who will ultimately control the organization. As the AFL-CIO has moved through successive stages of decline, struggle over the organizational mission has grown increasingly intense, finally leading to the exit of major constituencies. This study confirms the value of the concept of stages of decline, and underscores the role of internal politics, especially in a non-profit organization, in setting the criteria for evaluating performance.

ABSTRACT. Competition is a major driver of industry consolidation, pushing firms towards mergers or alliances. This paper discusses growing competitive challenges that make business partnering a core component of company strategy. We develop two frameworks for resource sharing using two dimensions: operational integration, and knowledge transferability. We analyze critical interface points at three levels in organizational design: corporate, business unit, and functional, and show that mergers could succeed without high level of integration. Large groups such as Renault and Ford witness such industry pressures from globalization, lower government protectionism, and shifts in buyer tastes. The framework illustrates preservation, incubation, osmosis, and full absorption as post-merger firm relationships, each requiring alignment with corporate strategy. The frameworks are illustrated using the Renault-Nissan relationship, the motivation behind it, its benefits, and its challenges.

ABSTRACT. Popular accounts of the labor movement suggest that unions have become weak organizations. There are, however, trends that indicate labor's political power has not waned in recent years. Using data from multiple sources, the results in this study indicate: (1) despite declines in union density, the percentage of union households has remained steady for two decades; (2) unions continue to produce a strong Democratic vote from its membership, even from its white male members; (3) unions are among the top campaign contributors and spenders in American elections; (4) unions hold significant influence among congressional Democrats and have made gains at the state and local level; and (5) public opinion of labor unions has remained consistently positive for several decades.

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