Volume 10, Number 3, Fall 2007

CONTENTS
REGULAR ARTICLES
Analysis of the Knowledge Creation Process: An
Organizational Change Perspective ................................................ 287
C.- A. Chen
Emerging Features of Public Administration in Mozambique: Sustainable Democratic Governance Challenges ......................... 314
C. Sampson
Searching for Cross-Cultural, Moral and Ethical Reality: A Case
of Bribery in an International and Entrepreneurial Context .......... 333
K. E. Aupperle and M. Camarata
Propensity to Trust as a Moderator of the Relationship
between Perceived Organizational Support and Job Satisfaction 350
J. M. L. Poon, A. H. M. Salleh and Z. C. Senik
SYMPOSIUM
Symposium on Labor Unions Today: Organizing and Politics,
Part II ................................................................................................ 366
P. L. Francia and R. C. Kearney
Is Union Political Action Compatible with Organizing? Some Preliminary Evidence ...................................................................... 367
M. F. Masters, R. Gibney and T. J. Zagenczyk
How the West Was Won: An Inside View of the SEIU's Strategies
and Tactics for Organizing Home Care Workers in Oregon .......... 386
P. M. Mareschal
BOOK REVIEW
The Coaching Organization: A Strategy for Developing Leaders ... 413
A. D. Benavides

ABSTRACT. Using participatory action research, this paper explains how the

Service Employees International Union and community groups collaborated

to organize home care workers in Oregon. The tactics used include policy

borrowing and tinkering, a ballot initiative, coalition building, lobbying, and

legislative politics. This approach to organizing low-wage human service

providers has important implications for other unions. Home care workers

are similar to many other human service providers because the funding

stream for their jobs is public. In essence, they are quasi-public sector

employees. The tactics employed by the SEIU may serve as a "handle" for

organizing other human service workers, who are employed by

nongovernmental organizations, but are paid through federal, state, and

local government funds.

ABSTRACT. Through the use of an international business example where

contract negotiations are involved, the authors illustrate how legal,

perceptual, and cultural differences influence the ethical and moral reality

confronting global business leaders. Absolutism and situational ethics are

scrutinized within a case context to demonstrate how opposing views of

ethical and moral reality can arise, particularly in a situation involving

bribery. An extensive and intensive debate occurs between a purchasing VP

of a large Korean company and the sales director of a small, entrepreneurial

firm from the heartland of USA. Personal and cultural values are

counterpoised through these two corporate agents in order to challenge the

absolutist position of "right and wrong or black and white."

ABSTRACT. Unions face serious challenges, which raise questions about

organizational priorities. An issue important to the recent breakup of the AFLCIO

is the priority given political action vis-à-vis organizing. We examine

competing theoretical perspectives on the potential relationship between

union political action and organizing effectiveness. We present evidence on

the scope of union political spending and conduct a preliminary analysis of

its correlation with organizing. Our results indicate a negative relationship,

but we urge a cautious interpretation. Theory raises substantial doubts

about political activity as a motivation for joining a union. We urge more

research.

ABSTRACT. This research attempts to identify and observe emerging

features of public administration (PA) in Mozambique, Africa's newest

democracy. Mozambique's public administration has had to assume a

significant role in the process of promoting sustainable human development.

Public administration in the country is challenged by Napoleonic character of

Constitutional arrangements for administering public policy, shortage of

skilled human capital and the apparent absence of human development

plans that would facilitate a more engaged civil society.

ABSTRACT. This study examined the relationship between perceived

organizational support and job satisfaction as well as the moderating effect of

propensity to trust on this relationship. White-collar bank employees (N=108)

were surveyed. The results of multiple regression analyses on the data collected

showed that perceived organizational support was positively related to job

satisfaction. The relationship between perceived organizational support and job

satisfaction, however, was stronger among employees with a low propensity to

trust than among those with a high propensity to trust. Implications of the

findings and directions for future research are discussed.

ABSTRACT. Knowledge creation (KC) is an important issue in a knowledge

society. Organizational change is required to facilitate KC which embraces

knowledge access and selection, knowledge diffusion, knowledge

application, and knowledge storage. In this paper, three momenta of

organizational change are reviewed and integrated. Knowledge access and

selection driven by institutional regulation takes place in the beginning

phase, knowledge diffusion and knowledge application driven by rationality

in the subsequent phase, and knowledge storage driven by structural inertia

in the last phase. Once the right momentum influences organizational

change in the wrong phase, KC can rarely be accomplished.

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