Volume 11, Number 1, Spring 2008

CONTENTS

REGULAR ARTICLES

Moral Decision Making: Searching for the Highest Expected Moral Value .................. 1

K. E. Aupperle

The Effects of New Product Development Teams on NewProduct Quality:

A Taiwanese-American Comparison ........................................................................... 12

L. P. White, T.-J. Chang, K.-Y. Jone and G. G. Hu

Organizational Genesis in the Nonprofit Sector: An Analysisof Demand,

Supply, and Community Characteristics ..................................................................... 37

Emily Barman

SYMPOSIUM

Institutional Analysis for Environmental Decision-Making:

A Symposium, PART II ............................................................................................... 61

B. L. Lamb

Institutional Change of the Agri-Environmental Governance in Finland ..................... 62

L. Kröger

Use of the Legal-Institutional Analysis Model in Mexican Environmental Disputes .... 85

D. Lybecker

Incorporating Institutional Power into the Disparate Stakeholder

Management Approach: A Case Study of Wildlife Management in the Southern

Greater Yellowstone Area .......................................................................................... 103

L. Koontz and D. L. Hoag

BOOK REVIEW

Debating Organization: Point-Counterpoint in Organization Studies ......................... 125

A. D. Benavides

ABSTRACT. Natural resource management decisions are complicated by

multiple property rights, management objectives, and stakeholders with

varying degrees of influence over the decision making process. Underlying

institutional factors will give certain stakeholders a greater level of influence

over the policy outcome. How a stakeholder uses their influence can greatly

effect the decision making process. We utilized the Legal Institutional

Analysis Model to account for stakeholders' political power in the decision

making process. We then extended the use of this model by integrating

concepts from decision analysis and public choice economics into a single,

comprehensive approach called Disparate Stakeholder Management. We

demonstrate this new approach in this report through a case study

concerning elk and bison management in the Southern Greater Yellowstone

Area.

ABSTRACT. Scholarly knowledge of organizational founding in the nonprofit

sector has grown not from macro-level analyses but rather from the

aggregation of in-depth and focused studies of particular geographical

regions or service fields. Employing logistic regression techniques, this

paper examines the formation of nonprofits in one key but overlooked site of

the voluntary sector: workplace charity. Testing competing theories, the

paper analyzes the effect of demand-side, supply-side, and community-level

characteristics on the presence of rival federated fundraisers in the largest

123 MSAs in 2000. The results indicate that these nonprofit organizations

are formed in large cities with a sizeable and stable nonprofit sector,

regardless of ease of access to charitable contributions and the level of

available funding.

ABSTRACT. The article reports the results from a natural resource

negotiation model, the Legal-Institutional Analysis Model (LIAM), in two

Mexican case studies: the Lerma River-Lake Chapala water system and

water concerns in the Paso del Norte region. Although the LIAM was

designed for use with U.S. based natural resource issues, this paper

discusses results of the LIAM in non-U.S. cases. Results reveal limitations

surrounding the assumption that economic and ecological values are

mutually exclusive, and the need for greater assessment of power sources.

Findings show that the general assumptions behind the LIAM were

applicable to Mexico, and that the model produced helpful assessments of

the two situations. It is recommended that limitations in the model should

be addressed to achieve more accurate analyses.

ABSTRACT. This paper investigates the influence of team characteristics and

organization context factors on new product quality and compares these

influences on Taiwanese (Collectivists) and American (Individualist) teams.

For the Taiwanese teams, new product quality was positively affected by the

capability of information integration and quality orientation of the firm, but

was negatively influenced by speed-to-market pressure and level of product

innovativeness. Functional and tenure diversity had no effect on new product

quality. The capability of information integration in a team tended to reduce

the negative effect of speed-to-market pressure on new product quality. For

American teams, new product quality was positively affected by functional

diversity, capability of information integration in the team, and quality

orientation of the firm, but negatively influenced by supplier involvement.

Customer involvement did increase the positive effect of the capability of

information integration on new product quality.

ABSTRACT. On joining the EU in 1995 Finland had to adopt its national

agricultural policies to follow the principles of the EU Common Agricultural

Policy (CAP), its accompanying measures and the environmental legislation

of the EU. This led to changes in the national decision making processes,

administrative procedures and operational practices. In this paper

institutional analysis is used to describe and interpret these changes and

the significance of these changes for policy development. The results show

that learning is a key for successful policy process.

ABSTRACT. This article offers a new way to conceptualize decision making in regard to ethical dilemmas and complex social issues. The framework provided here identifies steps essential to achieving the highest expectedmoral value. This process is complex but practical. The purpose is to help academics, students and practitioners in escaping from a simple black and white logic. The framework proposed here attempts to help analysts objectively assess the positives and the negatives associated with a given course of action in order to achieve the best possible outcome. All dilemmas have multiple solutions but too often we reach simple conclusions without addressing consequences. Clearly good moral intent can produce serious harm. Sometimes one may have to choose between the two; good moral intent versus good moral consequences.

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