Volume 11, Number 4, Winter 2008

CONTENTS

REGULAR ARTICLES

Executive Compensation: Does Industry Risk Matter? ............... 451

D. L. Haggard and K. S. Haggard

 

Automate to Informate: Positive Work Environments, Trust and

the Strategic Management of Technology ..................................... 471

J. Melitski, D. J. Gavin and J. H. Gavin

 

Symposium on the Future of Public Administration:

Assumptions, Processes, and Projections: Part II .......................... 495

R. J. Stupak

 

Executive Leadership: Securing the Future of Black Colleges

and Universities ................................................................................ 496

A. J. Schexnider

 

Positioning Public Administration Curriculum to Add Value:

The Case for "Transferrable Skills" ................................................. 518

D. S. Greisler

 

The Paradoxical Status of Planning and Time in Today's Public

Environment .................................................................................... 536

A. A. Halley and B. L. Catron

 

Increasing Information Integrity: Cultural Impacts of Changing

the Way We Manage Data .............................................................. 558

B. S. Larkin

 

The Future of ASPA: Meeting the Needs of Tomorrow's Public

Administrators ................................................................................. 579

P. M. Carlson, P. T. Dunning and J. N. Atkinson

 

BOOK REVIEW

Images of Organization ................................................................... 602

T. L. Hollar

ABSTRACT. This article addresses whether ASPA, the primary association of public servants, is able to effectively meet the needs of those who rely upon the organization for professional development, networking, and for currency in the field. This article follows up on a 2003 survey of members of the American Society for Public Administration (ASPA), and asks a random group of 2007 members what the major challenges of public service are today and if ASPA is contributing to their ability to deal with these issues. The results of the current survey indicate that the challenges remain remarkably similar, and highlight the need for ASPA to modify their approach if the association is to remain relevant and a premier professional society.

ABSTRACT. This article addresses the critical need for exceptional leaders to shepherd the nation's Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in a post-Brown era where African American students enjoy unlimited access to higher education in the United States. The article spotlights the many contributions Black colleges and universities have made to American society against insuperable odds since their inception in the mid-nineteenth century. It studies selected examples of HBCUs whose graduates have distinguished themselves in areas where other institutions enjoy centers of excellence. The article traces the historical inequities between major and minority
institutions, the challenges HBCUs face in surmounting these disparities, and the growing tendency of Black students to exercise their options by enrolling at White colleges and universities. With the loss of a pure monopoly on African American students, Black colleges now must find leaders of exceptional talent and vision in order to ensure their survival. The article recommends strategies designed to surmount hurdles and enhance the viability of Black colleges and universities in an increasingly competitive environment.

ABSTRACT. Best use of technology within a government organization should mirror the best practice use within business and industry today. Information integrity, cultural awareness, and enterprise integration form the foundation for success. The Public Administrator should read this treatise with an eye to real-life examples of how "the way" a technology is introduced can impact its success. Clear focus on the users and the processes are important. A concentrated, thorough approach to data governance and change management may seem restrictive, but it can maximize the value of your
technology, processes, people, and – perhaps most importantly – the information used to make your strategic and tactical decisions. The recommendations are applicable to most government and business technology initiatives.

ABSTRACT. Organizations implement information technology for a variety of reasons. Most often organizations look to information technology to automate existing processes in search of efficiency. We suggest that strategic management of technology allows for efficiency gains, but also holds the potential to create a healthier work environment. Organizational efficiency and effectiveness need not be mutually exclusive in the strategic management of information technology. Organizations can create a competitive advantage by using information technology to create a positive work environment while also automating existing processes. Our analysis begins with a discussion of positive psychology and strategic management. We discuss strategic uses of technology and present a framework for creating a positive work environment through the strategic use of technology. We conclude by developing areas for future research and present applicable strategies managers can use to increase organizational
efficiency as well as empower and enhance the well-being of workers.

ABSTRACT. This study examines the significance of time as a paradoxical factor and value in 21st century public policy, management, and planning. Five areas are considered: (1) time as a strategic and moral concern, (2) examples of planning and time in public environments ranging from the
individual level to the agency, policy, process, and contextual levels, (3) time in recent social and administrative theory, (4) time as a cognitive capability, and (5) the connection between time, planning, and learning. Conclusions and implications are developed to highlight the paradoxical status of
planning and time in today's public environment, and to suggest that, for public administrators, serving the public interest, near-term and long-term, is the heart of assuring that time becomes a central strategic and moral concern for public administration today.

ABSTRACT. Prior studies of the role of risk in executive compensation focus on market risk and firm risk, neglecting the role of industry risk in explaining executive compensation. We include industry risk and find that the portion of CEO compensation for bearing industry risk is greater than the portion of
CEO compensation for bearing market risk. Consistent with the human capital of a CEO being non-diversifiable, CEOs also receive compensation for bearing firm-specific risk, in contrast to investors, who can diversify their risk over many assets. CEOs are compensated for bearing firm-specific risks
through all the compensation tools we examine; salary, bonus, option grants and option exercises. CEOs are compensated for bearing market and industry risk primarily through stock option grants.

ABSTRACT. Public administration (PA) as an area of academic study and intellectual pursuit has long suffered from a lack of distinctiveness. While there is benefit inside struggle, and acknowledging that the field has advanced, there is progress remaining to be made. Focusing on the development of a skill base among Public Administrators that adds value to current vocational settings and positions the practitioner to be professionally lithe (through skills that are transferable to other public settings, quasipublic settings, and private industry) is personally and professionally healthy. To this end, mastery of statistical process control, process improvement, lean service/manufacturing, six sigma, and project management will optimally position the PA practitioner to add organizational value while
concomitantly maximizing vocational flexibility.

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