Volume 12, Number 3, Fall 2009

CONTENTS
REGULAR ARTICLES


Super-Docility in Organizations: An Evolutionary Model ............... 339
D. Secchi and E. Bardone

SYMPOSIUM
SYMPOSIUM ON


Organization Theory and Organization Behavior: Through the Lens of Psychodynamics, Part I ...................................................... 380
A. N. Carr and C. A. Lapp

Organization Theory and Organization Behavior: Through the Lens of Psychodynamics .................................................................. 381
A. N. Carr and C. A. Lapp

Compromising Positions: The Psychodynamics of the Death Instinct's Influence on Organizational Conflict Management ..... 406
A. N. Carr and C. A. Lapp

Organization and Meaning: A Multilevel Psychoanalytic Treatmentof the Jayson Blair Scandal at The New York Times ............ 441
H. S. Schwartz and L. Hirschhorn

Social Defense Structures in Organizations: How a Lack of Authorization Keeps Managers from Moving to
Transformational Leadership ......................................................................................................................................................................... 475
R. van Eeden and F. Cilliers

ABSTRACT. The systems psychodynamic perspective was used to explore the
functioning of a management team at one of the plants of a South African
production company experiencing change. The focus was on the impact of
social defenses on the leadership style being exercised. During a day long
consultation session with the team a dynamic of control and dependency
was observed. The transactional culture that can be regarded as "normal," in
this environment, actually became part of a defense strategy, resulting in
dependency and a lack of authorization that limited the use of
transformational leadership. A lack of clarity in terms of role and boundary
definitions furthermore resulted in a struggle in terms of interrelatedness
and a lack of interdependent functioning at a system's level.

ABSTRACT. To more fully understand impediments and enablers to
simultaneously meet or minimize differences between personal and others'
interests in the right way and at the right time, this paper explores the role
of psychodynamics in organisational conflict resolution. Specifically, it is the
application of death instinct theories as described by Freud, Klein, Alford,
and Spielrein that are used to explore quality of compromise and reasons
behind inabilities to engage in collaboration. In both individual and group
contexts, low-level and high-level compromise are discussed in terms of
being influenced through the process of identity dissolution that is akin to
feelings of dying, which may or may not be precursors to wanted and
unwanted transformation. It is the quality of conflict resolution that has an
impact on the quality of organisational behaviour development and
acceptance of organisational change.

ABSTRACT. Herbert Simon introduced the term "docility" to define the
tendency of human beings to get information from social channels. In this
paper, we enrich this first definition with distributed cognition based
arguments, and suggest that docile individuals modify the information they
get, before passing it on to others. We present a simulation model of docile
and non-docile individuals in organizations, where different docility attitudes
(behaviors) are considered. In standard conditions, findings suggest that the
above-average docile individuals remain below 20% of the number of
workers in a given organization. This way, we outline potentials and limits of
this intriguing concept.

ABSTRACT. This paper introduces this special issue and initially provides
some contextual background to the field of psychodynamics, its significance
to organisational studies and the understanding of behaviour in
organizations. The internationally-based papers in this special issue are
then introduced and summarised.

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