Volume 13, Number 2, Summer 2010

CONTENTS
REGULAR ARTICLES


Differentiating Knowledge Processes in Organizational Learning: A Case of "Two Solitudes" ........................................ 149
S. L. Hoe and S. McShan


SYMPOSIUM


Symposium on Workplace Aggression .......................................................................................................................................... 169
J. K. Williams

Introduction to Symposium of Workplace Aggression ................................................................................................................. 170
J. K. Williams

Attributional Influences on the Outcome-Aggression Relationship: A Review and Extension of Past Research ............ 174
P. Harvey, J. K. Summers and M. J. Martinko

Bullying in the Workplace: Definition, Prevalence, Antecedents and Consequences ............................................................ 202
S. B. Matthiesen and S. Einarsen

Predicting Workplace Aggression: Reciprocal Aggression, Organizational, and Individual Antecedents .......................... 249
T. M. Glomb

ABSTRACT. Although researchers have suggested that aggression is multiply
determined, most studies examine only a small set of predictors, focusing on
either situational or individual or reciprocal motives. Research has not
studied extensively the relative strength of multiple antecedent sets. Using
questionnaire data (n = 366), the current study examines eleven
antecedents of employees engaging in aggression: situational antecedents
(i.e., procedural, distributive, and interpersonal justice; organizational, work
group, and job related stress), individual difference antecedents (i.e., Type A
behavior, trait anger, reactions to anger), and reciprocal effects (i.e., being
the target of aggression). Individual difference antecedents and being the
target of aggression influence the frequency with which employees report
engaging in aggression. Situational antecedents are not significant
predictors once other antecedents are taken into account.

ABSTRACT. This article examines the phenomenon and concept of bullying
in the workplace. Workplace bullying is a form of interpersonal aggression
that can be both flagrant and subtle, but is mainly characterized by its
persistency and long term duration. The relationships between bullying and
related concepts such as workplace aggression and interpersonal conflict
are discussed. With reference to previous empirical research as well as
theoretical contributions, an attempt is made to clarify some important
aspects about the phenomenon, such as various subtypes of workplace
bullying. Empirical findings on prevalence, antecedents and outcome factors
are outlined and reviewed. The paper also discusses the dose-response
perspective.

ABSTRACT. The fields of organizational behavior (OB)/strategy and
marketing have taken different paths over the past two decades to
understanding organizational learning. OB/strategy has been pre-occupied
with theory development and case study illustrations, whereas marketing
has taken a highly quantitative path. Although relying on essentially the
same foundation theory, the two disciplines have had minimal crossfertilization.
Furthermore, both fields tend to blur or usually ignore the
distinction between structural and informal knowledge processes. The
purpose of the paper is to highlight the distinction between informal and
structural knowledge acquisition and dissemination processes and propose
new definitions to differentiate them. Future research should bring together
cross-disciplinary studies from OB/strategy and marketing to develop an
organizational learning framework to test structural knowledge processes
alongside informal knowledge processes.

ABSTRACT. We review past research on the relationship between
attributional perceptions, emotions, and workplace aggression and develop
a conceptual model that extends this research in two ways. First, we
consider the influence of controllability attributions on the type (otherdirected,
self-directed, hostile, non-hostile) and likelihood of aggressive
responses to negative workplace outcomes and situations. Second, we
consider the extent to which discrete negative emotions might mediate
these attribution-aggression relationships. Implications for anticipating and
preventing workplace aggression based on this conceptual model are
discussed.

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