Volume 13, Number 3, Fall 2010

CONTENTS
REGULAR ARTICLES


Exploring Organizational Culture and Performance of Christian Churches ............................................................................................ 305
W. B. Boggs and D. L. Fields

SYMPOSIUM


The Evolution of Government-Business Relations: A Symposium ............................................................................................................ 335
M. Van Wart

The Evolution of Government-Business Relations: Symposium Introduction ......................................................................................... 336
M. Van Wart

Tea Parties, Whigs and Compromise: The Historical Roots of U.S. Government-Business Relations ............................................ 342
J. R. Bartle

Government-Business Relations in China's Economic Development ...................................................................................................... 354
K. T. Liou and J. Wu

Strategic Perspectives on State Government as a Promoter of International Trade and Investment: The Case of California ........ 378
G. G. Kress, R. L. Miller and G. Koehler

Lean and Mean: An Assessment of Contract Cities ........................................................................................................................................ 408
A. Y. Ni

A More Realistic Approach to Citywide Municipal Wireless Networks: The Anchor Tenant Model? ....................................................... 429
H. Dyck and M. Van Wart

ABSTRACT. Municipal wireless networks (MWN) strive to provide broader
access to the internet with some form of governmental support, usually from
a city. They have generated considerable interest this decade with hundreds
being launched, and recently have garnered notoriety with the withdrawal of
providers like EarthLink, MetroFi, and Kite from the MWN market leaving a
number of large cities like Philadelphia, San Francisco, and Portland, OR,
scrambling with half completed systems, and many other cities scuttling
ambitious plans to "carpet" their jurisdictions. This paper discusses the
rationale for providing a public service in general; the specific arguments
used for and against municipalities developing MWNs; and the various most
common business models. We then briefly review the Philadelphia case and
contrast it with the case of Riverside, CA, which employs a different business
model. We conclude by reviewing the generalizations that can be made
about the policies surrounding MWNs at this point in their evolution.

ABSTRACT. This paper examines the development of government-business
relations in China's recent economic reform and development. The paper
first provides a review of theoretical issues about the role of government in
economic development and the concepts of business promotion and
government regulation. Next, the paper introduces major policies and
changes that have been developed by the Chinese government. On the
business promotion side, it includes major changes in incentive policy,
government structure, and management operation that have been
implemented during the reform years. On the government regulation side,
the paper identifies new challenging issues in consumer, environment, and
labor protection that may affect China's future development. Finally, lessons
and implications about the development of Chinese government-business
relations are emphasized in the conclusion section.

ABSTRACT. The paper examines the State of California's new international
trade and investment strategy through the lens of strategic management.
This examination, embedded in a discussion of the history of the state's
involvement, focuses on critical issues influencing strategy formulation and
implementation. Findings indicate conceptual strategy design issues,
political constraints, budgetary limitations, and organizational and
managerial deficiencies contributing to a limited state engagement in
international trade and investment with emphasis on leveraging existing
resources rather than providing primary services. Unless California finds
ways to deal with these issues, desired outcomes such as increased exports
and investments will be lacking. Several lessons are offered to inform future
state government efforts aimed at promoting international trade and
investment.

ABSTRACT. This article reviews the politics of government-business relations
in the US from 1776 to the present. It argues that two major political
interests, the agrarian democrats and the nationalist Whigs, created the
context for discussion of economic policy that continues today. At times,
pragmatic compromises have resolved the differences between these
interests. The lessons from this history are instructive for today, and suggest
potentially viable policies and coalitions to address business issues.

ABSTRACT. This study explores how dimensions of organizational culture are
related to performance in a sample of Christian churches. Alternative
models of the relationships of four dimensions of organizational culture with
multiple measures of church performance were explored using data
provided by staff and pastors describing 53 Christian churches. We
identified a model that fit the data very well in which the relative strength of
four organizational cultural dimensions are predictors of the levels of seven
alternative measures of church performance covering membership growth,
constituent satisfaction, staff and constituent learning and development,
and internal business processes. Church leaders desiring to improve
performance could consider focusing on strengthening the culture
dimensions that may be related to each area of church operations.

ABSTRACT. Ever since the colonial era, the US government has been
influenced by a market-orientated intellectual tradition. Under such a
tradition, an ideal social structure is a lean government in contrast to a
robust private sector. The recent surge of neoliberalism has advanced the
development of a market model of governance, which distinguishes itself
from the traditional state-centered bureaucracy in fundamental dimensions.
This paper provides an in-depth analysis of the contract city, which has
pursued many of the market principles to an extreme. The article traces the
evolution of contract cities in California, examines closely the structure,
operation, and management of contract city using the City of Highland as an
example, and discusses the implications of this new form of governance for
public management, organizational theory, and American political economy.

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