Volume 13, Number 4, Winter 2010

CONTENTS
REGULAR ARTICLES
Organizational Learning: Modeling an Intervention in a Foster Care System ........................................................ 465
M. P. Pokharel and L. S. Dudley
 
Public Administration and Modernism Revisited: A Maquette of Narrative Construction ..................................... 500
R. M. Cawley
 
Cross-National Variation in the Determinants of Job Satisfaction: How Far Do Our Results “Travel”? ........... 526
A. R. Timming
 
Technology Adoption and Organizational Culture in Public Organizations ............................................................. 546
J. Melitski, D. Gavin, and J. Gavin
 
Governance, Law, Religion and Culture ........................................................................................................................ 569
D. L. Haggard and K. S. Haggard

ABSTRACT. We proposed a model in which culture plays a dominant role,
along with religion and legal origin, in determining the quality of governance
in a country. We examined four dimensions of culture and four
measurements of governance quality across 71 countries. Our empirical
results demonstrated the dominant role played by culture, over and above
religion and legal origin, in explaining governance quality. As culture is
persistent and unlikely to be easily changed, efforts to improve governance
quality might be doomed to failure in nations with cultural values that are
hostile to good governance.

ABSTRACT. Twenty years ago, Hindy Schachter (1989) posed a question
about the foundation we use to structure the Public Administration theory
narrative. Would an approach based on an art model, rather than the more
common science model, produce a narrative with less distortion? This essay
employs a definition of modernism developed by Thomas Vargish and Delo
Mook outside the purview of public administration and a famous M. C.
Escher lithograph as a basis for proposing an alternate way to construct the
narrative. It then applies the alternative approach to Frederick Taylor and
Elton Mayo.

ABSTRACT. Organization culture and technology adoption are two of the
most critical issues facing organizations in a global society. Increasingly,
organizations operate in uncertain, networked, decentralized environments,
where adoption and use of information technology has become central to
fulfilling organizational missions. To examine the influence of organization
culture on individual willingness to adopt technology, this work began by
examining theories of behavioral intent, technology adoption, and
organization culture and then proposed a model for examining technology
adoption in public organizations. The research was based on the responses
from an online survey of government, nonprofit, and social service workers
from around the United States. The study found that there is a relationship
between individual perception of organization culture and individual
willingness to adopt technology. Finally, we addressed the limitations of the
study design and propose future research.

ABSTRACT. Using a large-scale dataset on working conditions across 31
European countries, this paper examines the nature and scope of crossnational
variation in the determinants of job satisfaction. The author
employs multi-group ordinary least squared regression analyses in order to
unpack the extent to which a set of "established" predictors of job
satisfaction are robust cross-nationally. The results of the research point to
widespread variation in the factors that promote and obstruct job
satisfaction. It is concluded that the findings of single-sample studies, which
constitute by far the vast majority of empirical research, cannot be readily
generalized across populations. The paper has philosophical and
sociological implications in respect to the processes of knowledge
dissemination in the social sciences.

ABSTRACT. Do state governments have the ability to predict the onset,
duration, and depth of structural fiscal crisis? The State of Indiana had a
particularly difficult time recovering from the recession that began in April
2001. Painful expenditure restraint and substantive revenue increases were
necessary simply to "break even" from 2002 through 2006. Could early
warning signs have permitted more timely actions to avert the subsequent
pain? Using monthly cash receipts and balances, we test whether these
data hold predictive value in forecasting the onset and severity of fiscal
imbalance. The evidence strongly suggests that the structural character of
the 2001-02 deficit and its subsequent depth was discernible in the cash
receipts stream early enough to take ameliorating action. That the state did
not do so reflects budgetary psychology more than the deficit's predictability.

ABSTRACT. This paper maps the organizational learning processes in a
policy intervention program. A state department of social services designed
an intervention for local agencies and implemented it with a university. A
closer observation of patterns detected organizational learning in local
agencies by the increase in the penetration rate—a ratio of federal to state
funding. An organizational learning model is constructed to understand the
organizational learning process in this particular instance. The model
includes learning modes and the roles that the policy knowledge instigators
had played in the process. Each mode and role is defined and the model is
refined based on in-depth interviews with participants in the learning
process.

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