Volume 14, Number 2, Summer 2011

CONTENTS
REGULAR ARTICLES


The Impact of Perceived Organizational Commitment and
Leader Commitment on Organizational Citizenship Behaviour ................. 145
S. Pohl and P. Paillé

SYMPOSIUM

Considering Myth in Public Administration: A Symposium ......................... 162
C. F. Abel

Considering Myth in Public Administration: Symposium
Introduction ........................................................................................................... 163
C. F. Abel

Why Myth Could Matter (But Probably Shouldn't) in Public
Administration ..................................................................................................... 168
C. F. Abel

The Myth of Shared Governance in Higher Education ................................. 200
B. W. Speck

Monsterous or Educative: The Hegemonic Mythology of Virtual
Organizations in Global Cyberspace .............................................................. 236
K. Thorne

The Enduring Myth of the American Dream: Mobility,
Marginalization, and Hope ................................................................................ 258
H. Wyatt-Nichol

ABSTRACT. The American Dream functions as a myth within our political
discourse by providing hope to citizens and reinforcing beliefs in the
protestant work ethic and meritocracy. This article examines the myth
through categories of mobility, marginalization, and hope. Elite theory and
institutional isomorphism are used to explore business privilege within
Public Administration. The ability to reframe the American Dream is
considered through an examination of select speeches at the 2008
Democratic National Convention. Despite evidence of declining mobility and
structural inequality, citizens cling to the myth. One explanation is that
marginalization perpetuates the American Dream by crowding out issues of
social class through various methods of institutional isomorphism. Another
explanation is that the dream endures because it can be re-conceptualized.

ABSTRACT. Against the various literatures asserting that myths serve
administrators well in varying ways, this paper takes a decidedly skeptical
stance. While myth is a tool that may be well or poorly used, its use to
fashion administrative theory, or to construct an administrative order, or to
enhance administrative thought is most often a poor use indeed. What
serves Public Administration best involves the much more difficult effort of
constructing theories of historical causation that derive directly from the
experiences that practitioners have with the problems they find it necessary
or desirable to solve.

ABSTRACT. This paper examines virtual organizations, operating in global
cyberspace. This paper uses Armstrong's (2005) conceptual orientation that
mythmaking is fundamental to humanity and Warner's (1994) Neo-
Barthesian (Barthes, 1957) methodology of distinguishing between
"monster myths" which conceal political motives and secretly circulate
ideological positions and her contrasting notion of "educative" myths which
are not always delusions but are vigorous ways of leading one to "make
sense of universal matters" (Warner, 1994, p. xiii) to recover the purposeful
illusions behind the beguiling spells cast by the "modern myths" of virtual
organizations. This paper finds that virtual organizations are impractical
organizations involving a visible myth that masks the invisible purposes of
the hegemonic (Torfing, 1999) control narratives of elites and global
corporate capital.

ABSTRACT. In terms of the role of myth in decision making, this paper
focuses on the way myth obfuscates critical issues related to shared
governance in higher education. The result of that obfuscation is a
minimization of the realities that work against shared governance by
favoring an untenable view based on an idealistic and unattainable vision of
shared governance. First, however, a critique of myth is in order to
demonstrate not only that myth is no more than ordinary interpretation but
also that it is insufficiently based on rationality and can become a dangerous
instrument in the hands of policy makers.

ABSTRACT. Prior studies have shown that commitment to the organization is
related to organizational citizenship behaviour (OCB). The target of
organizational commitment is the organization itself. So the organizational
citizenship behaviour most likely to be influenced by this commitment is
OCB-oriented organization (Masterson, Lewis, Goldman & Taylor, 2000;
Cohen, 1999). Given that workers are the targets of supervisor commitment
and work group commitment, the behaviour most likely to be affected by this
commitment is supervisor and worker-oriented behaviour. The results
provide support for the idea that organizational commitment is associated
with OCB-oriented organization.

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