Volume 14, Number 3, Fall 2011

CONTENTS


Innovation Management in Local Government: An Empirical
Analysis of Suburban Municipalities ............................................................ 301
K. L. Nelson, C. H. Wood and G. T. Gabris

Organizational Attention: A Metaphor for a Core Cognitive
Process ............................................................................................................. 329
E. Yaniv

Culture's Impact on Freedom and Peace: Empirical Evidence .............. 354
D. L. Haggard and K. S. Haggard

Linking the Feedback Environment to Feedback Seeking
through Perceptions of Organizational Support and Job
Involvement ...................................................................................................... 383
B. G. Whitaker

Rethinking Cultural Control in Global Corporations: From
Personal Socialization to Cultural Hybridizations ..................................... 404
B. Shimoni

ABSTRACT. This paper claims that global corporations should rethink the
concept of cultural control, which relies on an implicit culture, corporate
culture, for the control of local managers' thoughts and behavior. Instead,
based on hybridizations of corporate and local management cultures
created through personal socialization conducted by Swedish and American
corporations in local offices in Thailand and Mexico, the paper offers a
perspective for cultural control that views and understands cultures in terms
of change and hybridizations.

ABSTRACT. Organizational attention is an underdeveloped construct that can
account for a variety of organizational phenomena. Attention is the means by
which individuals select and process a limited amount of input from the
enormous amount of internal and environmental inputs bombarding the
senses, memories and other cognitive processes. This article develops a
coherent theory of organizational attention, drawing on Cornelissen's
domain-interactive metaphor model. Topics that form the building blocks of
individual attention research, including selective and divided attention,
automatic versus controlled processes, attention and memory, attention and
learning, are examined in terms of their applicability to the organizational
context.

ABSTRACT. The burgeoning literature on the feedback environment has
begun to link this important construct to many relevant employee behaviors
and attitudes. However, the underlying mechanisms linking the feedback
environment to feedback seeking are not well understood. To address these
gaps in the literature, this study integrates organizational support theory, the
norm of reciprocity, and current empirical research to develop and test a
model explicating this link. Data obtained from 202 supervisor-subordinate
dyads indicated that perceived organizational support and job involvement
play important roles in linking the feedback environment to supervisorreported
feedback seeking behavior.

ABSTRACT. The authors surveyed city administrators in the six-county Chicago
region to test an innovation management capacity process model. Innovation
management capacity is conceptualized as the function of council-staff
functionality, managerial leadership capacity, and staff team management. The
empirical results from 220 city administrators in 53 cities support the
hypothesis that the number of municipal innovations is positively correlated
with innovation management capacity, controlling for structural, socioeconomic,
and demographic variables. However, this study does not find a
statistical relationship between innovation effectiveness and innovation
management capacity. The authors posit two possible explanations for these
results and propose an alternative innovation management capacity process
model for testing in future research.

ABSTRACT. This study provides insight into the proportion of the variation
across countries in the desirable outcomes of freedom and peace that can
be accounted for using a set of national characteristics which are difficult, if
not impossible, to change. The majority of prior studies in this area have
utilized bivariate (correlational) analysis. While these studies have made
important contributions to the field, they have not been able to disentangle
the effects of other important national characteristics from the effect of
culture on freedom and peace. Through our multivariate framework, we are
able to shed light on the relative importance of these national characteristics
in explaining the variation in freedom and peace across countries.

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