Volume 15, Number 2, Summer 2012

CONTENTS
REGULAR ARTICLES

The Role of Leadership in Learning Culture and Patient Safety.................. 151
Y.M. Kim and D. Newby-Bennett

The Influence of Covariates on Latent Job Performance Ratings
from Differing Sources: A Mimic Modeling Approach .................................... 176
B. G. Whitaker

SYMPOSIUM

Symposium on Managing Performance of Faith-Based
Non-Profit Organizations, Part II ....................................................................... 199
D. Fields and B. Boggs

Moving From Maturity to Renewal: An Investigation of
Culture and Innovation ....................................................................................... 200
J. L. Parolini and M. D. Parolini

The Study of the Relationship between Organizational
Culture and Organizational Performance in Non-Profit
Religious Organizations ................................................................................... 239
R. J. Givens

Motivation to Serve in Faith-Based Non-Profit Churches: The
Role of Affective and Normative Commitment as Well as
Motivation to Lead ............................................................................................. 264
B. E. Winston, K. Cerff and S. Kirui

ABSTRACT. Christian Churches in the United States are facing decline and,
just like other organizations, must renew themselves. This study explores the
culture of a successful Midwestern church and its climate for innovation in
an effort to move this church toward renewal. Through multiple regression
analysis, support was found for the literature's claims that a strong
adhocracy culture has a significantly positive relationship with climate for
innovation. However, the findings offered startling support that a strong clan
culture has an even greater significant correlation with climate for
innovation. Interestingly, it was found that market and hierarchy cultures
have a small inverse relationship with support for innovation, and also that
market culture has a small inverse relationship with resource supply. These
results have significant implications for churches, ministries, and other
nonprofit leaders and their organizations.

ABSTRACT. The potential for differential functioning of performance
assessments across ratings sources has gained recent research interest.
This study used multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis (MGCFA) to
examine whether measures of task and contextual performance are
invariant across both supervisors and subordinates. As an extension,
multiple indicators multiple causes modeling (MIMIC) was used to examine
potential covariates of task and contextual performance ratings on latent
task and contextual performance variability. Consistent with previous
research, I found measurement invariance across subordinate- and
supervisor ratings. Moreover, MIMIC results showed supervisor and
subordinate demographic variables systematically influenced latent task and
contextual performance variability despite measurement invariance over
these rating sources. Implications for multi-source performance systems are
discussed.

ABSTRACT. This study defined and developed a four-item scale to measure
motivation to serve (MTS) then correlated it with Cerff's Motivation to Lead's
two scales as well as Affective and Normative Commitment scores. A
convenience sample of 89 participants came from a non-denominational
church in Oklahoma City, OK. The MTS showed significant correlation with
Normative Commitment but not with the two Motivation-to-Lead scales or
Affective Commitment. The benefit of this study lies in the development of a
new scale to measure Motivation to Serve and the understanding that the
new scale is significantly correlated with Normative Commitment.

ABSTRACT. Patient safety improvement through management has been a
prime issue since 2000, when the Institute of Medicine reported that
preventable mismanagement was responsible for the majority of medical
errors. Learning culture, interdisciplinary action teams, and punitive culture
have been discussed as viable ways to address these errors. While these
individual factors have been found to be significant, we have yet to
understand the interactions of these elements. The role of leadership,
which has been overlooked, is critical to facilitate or constrain these
elements. The interactions of these three elements and the role of
leadership were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Our finding
revealed the three elements were closely knitted, and leadership roles had
considerable impact in nurturing learning culture and constraining punitive
culture, which in turn enhanced patient safety.

ABSTRACT. This study investigates the relationship between organizational
culture and organizational performance in non-profit religious organizations
(churches). A quantitative methodology was utilized to explore this
relationship. Denison's model of organizational culture which includes
examining the organization in four areas (involvement, consistency,
adaptability, and mission) was explored to determine how this theoretical
model aligns with the culture of the church and its efforts to perform at
optimal level. Data were provided by staff and pastors of 43 Christian
churches. The findings showed partial evidence for a relationship between
culture and performance in churches. Church leaders can utilize these
findings to determine if the balanced scorecard method should be
implemented in their churches as a means of discovering if the values and
beliefs of the church are influencing the church's overall performance.

Go to top