Volume 8, Number 1, 2008

Using Agency Theory to Model Cooperative Public Purchasing ........................................................... 1
C. McCue and E. Prier

Size, Competition and Quality in the Italian Market for Consulting Services ......................................... 36
R. Cervigni, O. Cuccu and R. Miniaci

Choice in Government Software Procurement: A Winning Strategy ...................................................... 70
M. Sieverding

Cookies for the Real World: Assessing the Potential of RFID for Contractor Monitoring ....................... 98
N. Dew

BOOK REVIEW

Planning, Scheduling and Requirement Analysis ................................................................................... 130
K. F. Snider

ABSTRACT. The purpose of this paper is to draw together in one place knowledge that is relevant to the possible role of RFID (Radio Frequency IDentification) in contractor monitoring. The paper uses multiple case studies and internet survey methods to explore several issues in RFIDenabled monitoring of contractors. It also offers some conceptual frameworks to help decision makers think through ways RFID might emerge as a contractor monitoring technology as well as some of the key reasons for using this mechanism of monitoring. The paper concludes with research challenges and key issues for practitioners.

ABSTRACT. The quality of consulting services informing project decisions is crucial for the effectiveness of public investments. We analyze the ability of the consulting industry to provide adequate services to government agencies in Italy. At the aggregate level we observe that the value of the public demand for consulting services is a small and highly variable share of revenues of the consulting firms. At the micro level, we analyze the procurement data for some 300 feasibility studies. Although the market for those studies has been reasonably competitive, it has attracted a small fraction of the all consulting sector, and the quality of the studies has been unsatisfactory. We claim that an increasing public demand would provide more incentives for firms to focus their business on the provision of quality consulting services to the public sector.

ABSTRACT. Court decisions, based largely on principles of equal protection and non-discrimination, throw out laws with preferences for open source software, demonstrating that such laws are not only bad public policy, but may also be illegal, and that neutrality and choice in software procurement is the better approach.

ABSTRACT. Cooperative purchasing is beginning to receive renewed attention by scholars and practitioners alike in both the private and public sectors. Generally, cooperative purchasing arrangements have been reported to reduce costs, expedite transactions, and increase product knowledge. In the public sector, cooperative purchasing has been reported to reduce political risk, minimize Ared-tape,@ and, in some cases, avoid all reported social equity goals that are reported to increase costs. In this article, we contend that the lack of conceptual clarity has marred the literature on cooperative public sector purchasing, and as a result public sector purchasers have no theoretical guidelines to help them decide upon this purchasing mechanism. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to use agency theory to analyze, define, and establish a conceptual framework of cooperative public purchasing to help guide academics and practicing public sector purchasing professionals.

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