Volume 9, Number 3 & 4, Summer/Fall 2009

Job Analysis for the CPPB and CPPO Examinations ......................................................................................... 289
UPPCC Governance Board

The Implications of a Muddled Definition of Public Procurement ........................................................................ 326
E. Prier and C. P. McCue

State and Local Procurement Preferences: A Survey ......................................................................................... 371
Y. Qiao, K. V. Thai, and G. Cummings

PRACTITIONERS’ CORNER

Ethics in Public Procurement: Buying Public Trust .............................................................................................. 411
K. Hunsaker

USEFUL REPRINTS

Federal Contracting: Guidance on Award Fees Has Led to Better Practices But Is Not Consistently Applied ... 420
U.S. Government Accountability Office

BOOK REVIEW

Developing and Managing Requests for Proposals in the Public Sector ............................................................ 464
J. J. Schiele

ABSTRACT. In prior work, GAO found that contractors were paid billions of dollars in award fees regardless of acquisition outcomes. In December 2007, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued guidance aimed at improving the use of award fee contracts. GAO was asked to (1) identify agencies’ actions to revise or develop award fee policies and guidance to reflect OMB guidance, (2) assess the consistency of current practices with the new guidance, and (3) determine the extent agencies are collecting, analyzing, and sharing information on award fees. GAO reviewed the Departments of defense (DOD), Energy (DOE), Health and Human Services (HHS), and Homeland Security (DHS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)—agencies that constituted over 95 percent of the dollars spent on award fee contracts in fiscal year 2008.

ABSTRACT. At all levels of government, inconsistencies exist regarding the terminology and the body of knowledge used to understand public procurement. Perspectives on what public procurement is, or should be, ranges from routine ordering to sophisticated analysis of government spending. Definitional ambiguities have hampered attempts to define the field and unify its focus. This exploratory article examines the implications of the muddled nature of public procurement that has led to debate and uncertainty about the proper role of public procurement practitioners. To address these limitations, three dimensions of all public procurement systems are identified, and a general definition is proposed for describing the field and its institutionalized practices.

ABSTRACT. No procurement professional wants their name featured in the negative headlines. Ethics is a significant issue when it comes to public procurement. Public procurement professionals must keep abreast of not only the laws that govern their practice, but be keenly aware of the need for transparency in the way they conduct their transactions. The modern public
procurement department is faced with agency growth, ambiguity in performance measurement, and keeping pace with modern procurement trends. This article will present what an agency can do to thwart potential ethics violations before they occur in the hopes of creating a more positive public image.

ABSTRACT. Universal Public Purchasing Certification Council (UPPCC) is an independent nonprofit entity formed to govern and administer the Certified Public Purchasing Officers (CPPO) and Certified Professional Public Buyers (CPPB) certification programs. Periodically, UPPCC performs a job analysis study to ensure that the certification exams are aligned with the skills, knowledge, and abilities needed for successful job performance in public procurement. This article provides a brief summary of the 2007 job analysis study.

ABSTRACT. The use of public procurement as a vehicle for implementing various socioeconomic preference policies has a long history. This article reviews the current state of affairs of procurement preference programs with regard to U.S. state and local governments and analyzes their impact on both the recipients and on the public procurement process. Opportunities for further research are noted, and the authors conclude that the ability to navigate the difficult waters of socioeconomic preferences should be a core competency of state and local public procurement officials.

Go to top