Volume 10, Number 3, Fall 2010

Editorial .................................................................................................................................................................................. i
K. V. Thai

Symposium on International Public Procurement: Part I ....................................................................................................... 289
G. L. Albano and D.-i. Kim

Symposium on International Public Procurement: Introduction ..............................................................................................290
G. L. Albano and D.-i. Kim

Regulating Public Procurement Law at Supranational Level: The Example of EU Agreements on Public Procurement ...... 301
J. S. Schnitzer

Korean Free Trade Agreement Negotiations in Government Procurement: Results and Policy Suggestions ....................... 335
J. Yang

Public Procurement as an Industrial Policy Tool: An Option for Developing Countries? ........................................................ 368
R. Kattel and V. Lember

An Exploratory Study on the Mature Level Evaluation of e-Procurement Systems ................................................................ 405
M. J. Lee

Electronic Reverse Auctions and the Public Sector: Factors of Success ................................................................................ 428
M. E. Shalev and S. Asbjornsen

ABSTRACT. There are Increasing applications of e-procurement by government along with active e-commerce by the private sector in an advanced information society. The Korea e-Procurement System (G2B) is recognized as a successful example of substantially enhancing procurement process efficiency by making it transparent and professional. An analytic work is needed to systematically assess the functionality and role of the system. This paper’s purpose is the exploratory study on a mature indicator of evaluation of public e-procurement systems. This paper compares Korea’s case with those of the U.S., Australia, and New Zealand to show that in Australia and New Zealand, which are adopting a as dispersive supply method, the e-procurement system is not developed on a large scale in comparison with the US and Korea that are adopting a central supply method. There are some differences among the four countries according to the trait of their procurement institution and base value in terms of capability of system. Different usefulness for e-procurement depends on the public procurement institution in each country. This paper suggests that eprocurement systems can be used helping purchasing goods and services most reasonably. This paper can help us evaluating substantial value of eprocurement system clearly.

ABSTRACT. The government procurement market is one of the few markets where substantial trade barriers still exist. Many countries, including Korea, have been trying to reduce these market barriers through the World trade Organization (WTO) plurilateral government procurement agreement (GPA) and foreign trade agreement (FTA) negotiations. The actual results have been somewhat disappointing. This paper argues that one factor behind the disappointing results may be Korea’s negotiating text, heavily influenced by the GPA, that includes several provisions which may hinder efficiency and add to procurement costs. The paper offers a policy option for Korean FTA negotiators – a “half track” approach where Korea can offer mutual national treatment to the suppliers of the FTA partner with no (or very little) additional procedural or transparency requirements such as those associated with the GPA –type provisions.

ABSTRACT. This article sets out to answer two interrelated questions: is it advisable for developing countries to use public procurement efforts for development, and should more developing countries join the World Trade Organization (WTO) Government Procurement Agreement (GPA)? We survey government procurement should not be seen only as an indirect support measure for development, but also as a direct vehicle for promoting innovation and industries and, thus, growth and development. We also show that using public procurement for development assumes high levels of policy capacity, which most developing countries lack. In addition, we show how the GPA as well as other WTO agreements make it complicated for the developing countries to benefit from public procurement for innovation. The article suggests that the developing countries could apply a mix of direct and indirect (so-called soft) public-procurement-for-innovation measures. In order to do this, developing countries need to develop the policy capacity to take advantage of the complex and multi-layered industrial policy space still available under WTO rules.

ABSTRACT. This paper provides an analysis of the fragmented sphere of international agreements on public procurement law in the European Union. After a comprehensive review of the most important European Communities agreements on public procurement, this paper describes how these agreements can be subdivided within certain categories and certain types and how this categorisation and typification is vital with regard to the legal effect of a particular agreement. In this regard, it is argued that EC agreements on public procurement (including the World Trade Organization Agreement on Government Procurement) are, in principle, capable of direct applicability. Thus, disappointed bidders are – from an EU perspective –, in general, able to invoke the provisions of such EC agreements before national courts and authorities, based upon the non-discrimination principles incorporated in such agreements.

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