Volume 11, Number 1, Spring 2011

Psychological Climate, Catharsis, Organizational Anomie, Psychological Wellness and Ethical Procurement Behaviour in Uganda's Public Sector ................................................................................................................................................ 1
J. M. Ntayi, A. Ahiauzu and S. Eyaa

Economic and Political Determinants of Public Procurement Corruption in Developing Countries: An Empirical Study from Uganda ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 33
B. C. Basheka

Recent Reforms to Promote Social Responsibility Procurement in East Asian States: A Comparative Analysis ........ 61
D. S. Jones

Examining the Merits of Municipal Police Contracting ................................................................................................. 96
R. W. Schwester

A Detailed Analysis of the Relationship between Contract Administration Problems and Contract Types .................. 108
B. Davison and R. J. Sebastian

ABSTRACT. Guided by a conceptual model developed by Davison and Wright (2004), Davison and Sebastian (2009) surveyed National Institute of Government Purchasing (NIGP) and Institute of Supply Management (ISM) members to determine empirically which types of contract administration problems (e.g., delays) were perceived as most likely for seven types of contracts (e.g., small supplies and purchases). The mean ratings of the perceived occurrence of the ten problems for each contract problem were reported. The types of contract that had the greatest overall perceived occurrence of problems across all problem types and the types of problem that were perceived to be the most common across all contract types were also reported. This research extends these analyses by examining specifically which types of contract administration problems were perceived to be most common for each of the seven contract types and by examining which contract types were perceived to be most affected by the ten contract administration problems. The implications of the research results for procurement professionals and the limitations of the research are discussed.

ABSTRACT. This paper examines the economic and political determinants of public procurement corruption in Uganda. Using data from 548 respondents in the public, private and NGO sectors of Uganda, the paper identifies critical economic and political determinants of public procurement corruption in Uganda. All over the world, the attention of policy makers, academics, development partners, the general public, civil society organizations and politicians has been drawn to the negative effects of corruption on development and the delivery of effective services. Corruption; a phenomenon as old as man himself (Shabbir & Anwar, 2007) has recently risen to the top of the development agenda, particularly in the developing economies. It is this recognition that leads to investigation of why corruption exists and what makes it so differently widespread among countries (Serra, 2004). Unlike in the past where corruption research was the preserve of economists and political scientists, today other disciplines like public procurement have significant interest. This paper compares the emergent results with local and international literature. It presents a number of theoretical and managerial implications for addressing the “disastrous monster” of procurement corruption in the context of the developing world.

ABSTRACT. The touted benefits of inter-governmental contracting are cost savings and simplicity when compared to shared service agreements. Some managers and public officials resist contracting given the assumption that there may be a drop-off in service quality. However, inter-governmental contracting introduces market forces which theoretically would improve performance while keeping costs per unit of output low (Boyne, 1998). This paperexamines municipal police contracting in the State of New Jersey, the purpose of which is to determine if there are statistically significant differences in non-violent crime rates among municipalities that maintain their own police force versus those that contract with neighboring municipalities for police services. Contracting costs are also explored. While summary statistics indicate lower non-violent crime rates among municipalities that maintain their own police force compared to those that contract for police services, multiple regression results indicate that contracting does not predict higher non-violent crime rates at the .05 level. Therefore, contracting for police services should be explored as an alternative municipal policing model.

ABSTRACT. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between psychological climate, catharsis, organizational anomie, psychological wellness and ethical procurement behaviour in Uganda's public sector, in order to understand better the conditions that foster or diminish procurement ethics in a developing country. Data for this study were collected from a sample of 1100 respondents out of which 460 usable questionnaires, representing a 42% response rate were received and analyzed. Results reveal that psychological climate, procurement planning and organizational anomie were significant predictors, accounting for 64% of the variance in ethical procurement behaviour. These results have both policy and managerial implications which we present and discuss in this paper.

ABSTRACT. In many countries, public procurement of goods, services and works is required to serve wider social purposes apart from the needs of the user agencies (which may be referred to as social responsibility procurement). In recent years, reforms have been implemented in the countries of East Asia to promote social responsibility procurement. They have entailed four main types of social responsibility: (a) supporting small and medium enterprises; (b) creating opportunities for small or start up venture firms; (c) fostering environmental sustainability through green purchasing, and environmentally sustainable construction (in the case of public works); (d) promoting work safety in site management in public works. The paper will examine the reforms in the countries of the region under which various preferential arrangements have been implemented to meet these objectives. It will consider why the reforms were adopted and also the differences between the countries of the region in the priority given to each of the reforms.

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