Volume 13, Number 3, Fall 2013

Dispelling Fear and Loathing in Government Acquisition: A Proposal for Cultivational Governance in DOD Source Selections .................................................................................................................................................. 289
S. M. Maser and F. Thompson

Design and Build Procurements in the Polish Public Sector .................................................... 315
A. LeĊ›niak and K. Zima

Public Policy and Financial Management through EProcurement: A Practice Oriented Normative Model for Maximizing Transformative Impacts ............................................................................................................ 337
A. V. Roman

An Appraisal of the Use of Social Criteria in Public Procurement in Nigeria ................................................................................................................................................... 364
T. O. Akenroye

ABSTRACT. Socially responsible procurement is increasingly attracting public attention, but little is known about the use of social requirements in public procurement process in developing countries. This study explores the use of social criteria in public procurement in Nigeria. Data was collected from two websites being used for advertising public sector contract opportunities in Nigeria and by means of a questionnaire. Results show that public procurement is mostly used to promote a range of government policies and programmes. Based on the findings from this study, it cannot be concluded that a milestone has been reached in the use of public procurement to drive social benefits in Nigeria. The extent to which the findings of this study could be generalised is limited, because the findings are based on analysis of tender documents and a smallsized convenience sample of public procurement experts. A larger sample size may lead to improved accuracy or dissimilar results. Nevertheless, the research offers some baseline data against which future studies on social procurement can be conducted and evaluated.

ABSTRACT. One of the possible systems of project delivery is design & build (D&B), which is widely used in many countries. In the Polish public procurement market, the D&B system has been applied for a relatively short time, only since 2004, and despite the possibility, so far public clients have applied the D&B system only occasionally. This paper describes the current status of using the D&B method in the public procurement sector in Poland. Five hundred and fifty eight completed public-sector projects have been subject to analysis. Items analysed include the design/builder method of award, and types and value of contracts. The results provide insights for owners, the advantages and disadvantages of the D&B system, and highlight the need to change the method of selecting the contractor for the D&B system.

ABSTRACT. Scholars have suggested that the current dynamics within the provision of public services have shaped traditional administration into governance by contract. Under such conditions, restructuring public procurement, specifically within the technological capabilities available within e-procurement, has often been associated with manifold positive financial and policy outcomes. The supposed benefits of digitalizing public procurement are legion, yet they are often assumed and rarely grounded in hard evidence. Based on the results of a survey of procurement specialists (n=499), this article suggests that in its current form e-procurement adoption is failing to uphold the transformative benefits that it is regularly attributed within popular discourse. An extensive literature review is undertaken in order to construct practical understandings of the factors that could explain the rather disappointing early developments. The paper offers a practice oriented normative model that would increase the probability of achieving transformative dynamics as a result of e-procurement adoption.

ABSTRACT. Government contracting is rife with miscommunication and misperception, sometimes unavoidably, and is often associated with secrecy, autarky, and opportunism. These qualities undermine trust, increase contracting costs, and reduce effective collaboration between business and government. In this article we show how mutual trust can be repaired and, once repaired, bumped up and made much more robust through cultivational governance. The proximate aim of the article is improving source-selection in government acquisition; its scholarly purpose lies in contributing to a process theory for recovering and reinforcing trust.

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