Volume 15, Number 1, Spring 2015

Impact of Contract Bundling and Consolidation on Defense
Acquisition System and Defense Industrial Base: The Case of
the U.S. Department of the Navy .......................................................       1
M. V. Kidalov
 
Public Procurement Specialists: They Are Not Who We Thought
They Were ...........................................................................................   38
A. V. Roman
 
Implementing Sustainability in Public Procurement: The Limited
Role of Procurement Managers and Party-Political Executives .......     66
C. J. Gelderman, J. Semeijn and F. Bouma
 
Looking Beyond Accession: Challenges to Implementing the
World Trade Organization Government Procurement Agreement
in China ...............................................................................................   93
D. J. Cook

ABSTRACT. Much of the literature on China’s ongoing attempts to accede to the World Trade Organization (“WTO”) Agreement on Government Procurement (“GPA”) focuses on which Chinese entities will ultimately be covered by the Agreement. While coverage issues are, no doubt, important, this paper argues that China will face an even greater number of challenges when implementing and harmonizing the requirements of the GPA with its own domestic procurement laws. In particular, the GPA’s Article XVIII requirement for an effective domestic review mechanism may be especially difficult for China to achieve. In light of these challenges, this paper argues that current GPA members should address problems with China’s domestic legal framework for procurement now, not look to the domestic review device to resolve problems after accession.

ABSTRACT. Recently there has been an impressive growth in the scholarly literature on public procurement. The study of the administrative roles assumed by public procurement specialists is, however, one area that remains largely underexplored. Somewhat curiously, the professionals making a career in the field are often an afterthought when it comes to empirical research. Outside of anecdotal accounts, there is little that is known in terms of the roles that procurement specialists assume on daily basis. In this respect, there is an important knowledge gap within the field’s body of literature. This article attempts to address this knowledge gap through an exploratory empirical evaluation of the administrative behaviors of public procurement specialists.

ABSTRACT. Little is known about the way local government utilizes the procurement function to promote sustainability. Sustainability is a political theme of considerable importance at the local government level. We investigated the relationships between municipal executive councillors and procurement managers in three Dutch municipalities. We found that the party-political councillors focus on initiatives affecting citizens to create public visibility and electoral support. Procurement managers however, are primarily concerned with stakeholders within the organization serving different interests. Sustainability initiatives appear largely input-based rather than result-based. Procurement managers rarely consult with the councillors. Rather, department heads have the final say in allocating funds in the course of sustainability initiatives.

ABSTRACT. Despite Congressional and Presidential emphasis on reducing bundling and consolidation of defense contracts, recent studies cast doubt on whether such practices are problematic for small contractors or the defense acquisition system. Those studies proposed that bundling and consolidation are generally positive tools to procure best value. This paper tests these propositions by examining relevant U.S. Department of the Navy (DON) contracts for Fiscal Year 2010, when Congress reported record bundling and consolidation in U.S. defense contracting. Specifically, the paper looks to performance of Navy and Marine Corps buying commands in meeting small business goals and other good-government objectives such as competition, performance-based acquisitions, preference for commercial suppliers, and support for the U.S. defense industrial base. The paper recommends improvements in targeted good-government practices as measures to reduce bundling and consolidation.

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