Volume 16, Number 3, Fall 2016

Overcoming the Barriers to Green Procurement in the County: Interest Groups and
Administrative Professionalism ………………...…….…………………….…………….................       259
C. Smith and J. Terman

                                                                 SYMPOSIUM

Symposium on International Public Procurement ……………………..………......................     286
K. V. Thai and R. A. Suryo
 
Symposium Introduction …………………….…………………….……………..………..………............     287
K. V. Thai and R. A. Suryo
 
Collusion between Public Procurers and Suppliers in the Context of Japan’s Public
Procurement:The Role of the Risks of “Unsuccessful Procurement” .……………............    291
S. Tanaka and S. Hayashi
 
Implementation of Sustainable Public Procurement Practices and Policies:
A Sorting Framework …….…………………….……………….…….…………………….………………......     312
E. Prier, E. Schwerin, and C. P. McCue
 
Elements of Public Procurement Reform and their Effect on Public Sector in LAC …….    347
L. E. Harper, A. C. Calderon and J. E. Muñoz
 
Compliance to Acts, Rules and Regulations: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa ……….   374
M. Mbago, J. M. Ntayi and M. Muhwezi

The purpose of the study is to develop and test an integrated compliance model using constructs derived from the legitimacy, deterrence, institutional and stewardship theories. A Cross-sectional survey design was used to collect data from a sample of 97 out of the population of 129 Procuring and Disposing Entities which are regulated by the Public Procurement and Disposal of Assets Authority Act (PPDA). Measurement items were derived from a critical review of literature and found to be both valid and reliable with Cronbach Alpha coefficient of 0.7. The findings reveal that legitimacy and stewardship behavior are significant predictors of compliance to the PPDA Act, Rules and Regulations. We therefore recommend that Procuring and Disposing Entities should continue legitimizing the procurement law through involvement of all stakeholders and promote stewardship behaviors among public employees.

This paper examines the economic forces which may lead to government-assisted or -facilitated bid-rigging (kansei-dango) in public procurement in Japan, and considers their implications. A public official may often worry about situations where his/her procurement project will not be successfully implemented. Based on a simplified theoretical treatment and on case studies of kansei-dango, it is argued that the desire to avert the risk of unsuccessful procurement resulting from the “experience goods” status of procured goods and/or services may be one reason for bid-rigging. Based on this understanding of kansei-dango, we discuss some implications for policies to restrain this type of corruption.

Between 2007 and 2013, public procurement systems in Latin America and the Caribbean underwent a critical reform process. However, not much is known about the elements of reform and their effect on the public sector. In order to assess this gap in knowledge, this study used an institutional evaluation multivariate tool developed and carried out by the Inter-American Development Bank called PRODEV. Based on a sample panel of countries, effects on the development of public procurement systems were calculated. The results indicated that, of the three main areas of procurement reform evaluated, the creation of a procurement agency2 had the largest impact. At the same time, evidence was found that backed the hypothesis that creating these agencies had a positive effect on the perception of public sector performance.

The symposium covers various contemporary and important issues in public procurement in several countries: from collusion in public procurement, the practices and policies of sustainable public procurement, public procurement reforms, to compliances issues in public procurement.

In general, there are many disincentives standing in the way of promoting change in public procurement practices by government agencies. Because engaging in sustainable purchasing requires some level of entrepreneurialism and risk-taking, a sorting framework is adopted to gauge whether some organizations are systematically more likely to pursue sustainable public purchasing (SPP) efforts than others. One-way analysis of variance and other methods are applied to a survey of public procurement practitioners across over 300 governments in the U.S. Results strongly suggest that agencies of various scope and reach tend to abstain from aggressively pursuing SPP efforts. However, when they do employ SPP, these efforts tend to be quite variable across and within levels of government and organizational size. In an effort to bridge theory with empirical data, a strong case can be made that the current state of SPP in the United States is the result of random and very cautious experimentation with little systematic pattern to SPP adoption.

Scholars and practitioners have come to understand the important role of local governments in the causes and effects of climate change. The literature has examined both the substantive and symbolic determinants of urban sustainability policies in addition to the implementation issues associated with those policies. At the heart of these policies is the idea that local governments have the desire and ability to engage in socially and environmentally responsible practices to mitigate climate change. While important, these studies are missing a key component in the investigation of local government involvement in sustainability policies: government purchasing power. This study examines the effect of administrative professionalism and interest group presence on the determinants of green procurement in the understudied context of counties in the United States.

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