Volume 17, Number 2, Summer 2017

Volume 17, Number 2, Summer 2017

REGULAR ARTICLES

Analyzing Buyer Behavior When Selecting Green Criteria in Public Procurement ..............................................        141

M. Igarashi, L. d. Boer and G. Pfuhl 

Twelve Years of Scottish School Public Private Partnerships:  Are They Better Value for Money? .....................        177

R. Yaya

Research Perspectives on Public Procurement: Content Analysis of 14 Years of Publications in the 

Journal of Public Procurement ....................................................................................................................      229

A. S. Patrucco, D. Luzzini, and S. Ronchi

BOOK REVIEW

Pursuing Sustainability: A Guide to the Science and Practice ……..............................................................      270

S. Sudhakar

The paper aims to evaluate the state of the literature on public procurement through examination of the works published in the Journal of Public Procurement from 2001 to 2014. 231 research outputs were collected and analyzed (with regard to, e.g., the background theory used, research method, and content of the papers), providing a structured overview of prior research topics and findings and identifying main gaps in the existing literature. This type of study is unique, as a broad literature review related to public procurement does not currently exist; therefore, the work has been designed with the intention to a) synthetize the prior research on public procurement; b) provide researchers with a structural framework in which future research on public procurement topics may be oriented; c) identify promising and active areas for future research.

This research evaluates the value-for-money (VFM) obtained from public-private partnership (PPP) schools in Scotland, based on headteachers questionnaires, local authority interviews and Scottish School Estate Statistics. The period covered is 2000-2012, when 395 new schools were commissioned. The PPPs were better in building condition and maintenance standards and conventionally-financed schools were better in terms of teacher access and improvement in staff morale. There was transfer of knowledge whereby the high standards of the PPPs then became the new standards for the conventionally-financed schools. Concerns about PPP VFM relates to the high cost of unitary charges and contract inflexibilities. A higher percentage of headteachers of conventionally-financed schools (63.64%) considered their new schools resulted in good VFM compared to PPP schools (42.86%).

The topic of sustainability has gained international significance in the past two decades due to reports of depletion of natural resources, climate change, and the growing concern for health and wellbeing. Especially because procurement and supply chain processes are globally connected - what happens in one part of the world impacts other regions in other parts. According to the World Economic Forum held in Davos Switzerland in 2016, sustainability is a three legged stool involving people, planet and profits. Businesses and governments across the globe are committing to working with their supply chains and procurement functions to adopt transparent sourcing, and distribution strategies in consultation with their local communities to enhance business growth while adopting sustainable practices. It is specifically on this background that books such as “Pursuing Sustainability” by P. Matson, W. C. Clark and K. Andersson become critical and have the opportunity to make important contribution to shaping practice and theory.

Given the complexity of green public procurement, decisions are likely to be driven by bounded rationality. However, we know little about what determines supplier selection criteria in any given situation. This study explores buyer behavior when considering environmental criteria. We first conducted interviews and identified 12 operational procedures used by buyers. We then developed a survey to explore the use of these procedures. Our quantitative analysis suggests that public buyers are motivated by their belief that they can make a difference. This is independent of buyers’ experience or gender. However, their occupational position and the nature of a procurement seem to influence how buyers seek information about environmental criteria and which information source(s) they use. The data suggest that four specific decision-making heuristics are associated with the selected operational procedures.   

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