Volume 5, Number 2, 2005

Improving Organizational Effectiveness through Meaningful Involvement of Municipal Purchasing Departments – Case Studies from Ontario Canada .................................................................................................................................................................. 145
J. J. Schiele

Measurement Issues in Performance-Based Logistics ...................................................................................................... 164
K. Doerr, I. Lewis and D. R. Eaton

A Regression Approach for Estimating Procurement Cost ................................................................................................. 187
G. W. Moore and E. D. White III

Competence Requirements for Managing Supply in Interorganizational Networks ....................................................... 210
L. Knight, C. Harland, H. Walker and R. Sutton

PRACTITIONERS’ CORNER

Staff Assistance Visit: Bridging the Gap between Headquarters and the Operational Contracting Officer ................ 235
B. Piper

USEFUL REPRINTS

Best Practices: Using Spend Analysis to Help Agencies Take a More Strategic Approach to Procurement ............. 244
U. S. Government Accountability Office

BOOK REVIEW

Planning, Scheduling and Requirement Analysis ................................................................................................................. 274
M. A. Feldheim

ABSTRACT. The Staff Assistance Visit Program (SAV) is an important tool used by the Department of State’s Procurement Executive since 1995 to support the Department’s overseas contracting operations. The program is structured much differently from a formal contract compliance review. The SAV’s purpose is to improve relationships between the field and headquarters. Also, the program provides hands-on expertise to improve operations. During the visit, the SAV team works to reinforce existing training, solve real problems, and improve communications with the contracting office and its clients. The program consistently demonstrates its value of assisting geographically dispersed contracting officers overcome the numerous contracting challenges that they encounter around the world.

ABSTRACT. Performance Based Logistics (PBL) is an acquisition reform that is intended to improve weapon systems logistics by reducing cost, improving reliability, and reducing footprint. PBL is an extension of a broad process of rationalizing and, in many cases, outsourcing government services. As with other examples of governmental service outsourcing, measurement issues arise in the gap between governmental objectives and service measurement, and in the contrast between clear profit-centered vendor metrics, and more complex mission-oriented governmental metrics. Beyond this, however, PBL presents new challenges to the relationship between governmental agencies and their service vendors. In many cases, weapons systems logistical support involves levels of operational risk that are more difficult to measure and more difficult to value than other government services. We discuss the implications of operational risk and other measurement issues on PBL implementation.

ABSTRACT. Cost growth in Department of Defense (DoD) weapon systems continues to be a scrutinized area of concern. One way to minimize unexpected cost growth is to derive better and more realistic cost estimates. In this vein, cost estimators have many analytical tools to ply. Previous research has demonstrated the use of a two-step logistic and multiple regression methodology growth in procurement dollar accounts for the Engineering and Manufacturing Development phase of DoD acquisition. We develop and present two salient statistical models for cost estimators to at least consider if not use in mitigating cost growth for existing and future government acquisition programs.

ABSTRACT. This paper could have implications for both public service managers and academics alike. Some of the most difficult challenges facing public purchasers, including those associated with public sector procurement, purchasing consulting services, and purchasing department involvement are discussed. This paper presents insight into the beliefs of municipal purchasing department managers as they relate to meaningful involvement of their departments in consulting service acquisition processes. These research findings may assist others with developing the strategies necessary for increasing municipal purchasing department involvement in these acquisition processes in order to improve organizational effectiveness.

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